Why is java the best language to learn for a beginner /biz/nessman?

Boy_vs_Girl
Boy_vs_Girl

why is java the best language to learn for a beginner /biz/nessman?

All urls found in this thread:
http://interactivepython.org/runestone/static/thinkcspy/toc.html
https://automatetheboringstuff.com
http://www.greenteapress.com/thinkpython/thinkpython.pdf
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z-OxzIC6pic&list=PLvJoKWRPIu8G6Si7LlvmBPA5rOJ9BA29R
King_Martha
King_Martha

Because you can write a shitty game for android phones

girlDog
girlDog

Java is not the best language to learn for beginners

takes2long
takes2long

@girlDog
what is the best language for beginners?

massdebater
massdebater

@takes2long
what is the best language for beginners?
Spanish

Gigastrength
Gigastrength

@takes2long
python

Deadlyinx
Deadlyinx

@Gigastrength
what is the best resource to learn python?

is there a quicker option than sitting through the entire MIT online course or will that be the best method of learning?

Techpill
Techpill

What language is used to create websites?

Or is something else used for them?

If I start my own business how could I go about making a website for it, assuming I dont pay someone else to do it?

AwesomeTucker
AwesomeTucker

@Deadlyinx
I've been having a good time with this: http://interactivepython.org/runestone/static/thinkcspy/toc.html

Bidwell
Bidwell

@Deadlyinx
I prefer books imo.
Try "Learning Python the Hard Way". Seems good.

TreeEater
TreeEater

@Techpill
If you care about your business you will pay someone else to do it.

t. web developer

Crazy_Nice
Crazy_Nice

Does having your own website automatically mean you have to pay for monthly server and domain costs?

girlDog
girlDog

Java is the best cause you can actually get a decent high paying job with it. .net languages are also high paying.

javascript/html/css is also worth learning .

@Crazy_Nice
yes.

Snarelure
Snarelure

@girlDog
@girlDog
so you would recommend java over python?

and then learning javascript/html/css afterwards?

is python ever worth learning then?

CouchChiller
CouchChiller

@Bidwell

Learn Python the Hard Way is shit. Literally a fucking typing test. Don't be a cunt. Spend $80 on a Coursera course on Machine Learning and have an actual portfolio of working apps when you're done.

JunkTop
JunkTop

@CouchChiller
Coursera course on Machine Learning
doesnt that course require prerequisite knowledge of python? or can you go in as a complete python noob and learn what you need?

Soft_member
Soft_member

@Deadlyinx
@JunkTop
If you want a good intro to python course with no prerequisite knowledge I STRONGLY recommend https://automatetheboringstuff.com

Some people will object to it because it prioritises being practical and useful over being rigorous. But it is very enjoyable and fosters a healthy mindset towards programming as a tool.
It's kind of the ideological opposite of Learn Python The Hard Way which I agree with @CouchChiller
is shit.

Remember that you shouldn't learn to program just because you want to be a programmer.
Programming is a tool. You need to have problems you want to solve and ideas for projects to work on or you won't get anywhere.

The way programmers get good is a continuous cycle of starting projects at the edge or even beyond your ability and then learning what you need to make it happen.

Methnerd
Methnerd

@Snarelure
python is a meme language . Its cool and stuff but doesnt get you far. It reaches a ceiling in terms of is potential to make you marketable and atleast have money.

Your best bet is a language enterprises use and that is either java or .net .

Plus with java you could also build apps of you are not a lazy fuck.

The reason why javascript/html/css is valuable is because its the default internet set of technologies.

So you can fiddle around with pretty much any web based technology like Angular JS, SAP UI5, Web apps, ux designs , ethereum apps ect.

Lord_Tryzalot
Lord_Tryzalot

@Techpill
JavaScript is for developing a website. Also you will need to learn markup languages like html/css. Best place to start I would say codecademy, which let you practice coding in real time, just to get a glimpse of what it does then purchase some courses on Udemy once you decide to go deeper into it

Evil_kitten
Evil_kitten

@JunkTop

Forgive the slow response.

It doesn't require any prerequisite knowledge of Python, just a general understanding of how logic and programming work, along with some sense of Calculus, Linear Algebra, and Statistics. I had never touched Python before, but my understanding of R and MatLab made out fairly easy to pick up. It you understand where the lecture is taking you, is really only a matter of syntax.

One word of caution though... The female they have recording the lectures is fucking heinous looking. She is ugly to the point of distraction. Like Coney Island levels of hideousness.

haveahappyday
haveahappyday

@Boy_vs_Girl
Because java, much like English. Is a language the whole world speaks

Poker_Star
Poker_Star

@Deadlyinx
http://www.greenteapress.com/thinkpython/thinkpython.pdf

TreeEater
TreeEater

Python is good for about 15 minutes.

Then if you need to learn type theory or do any real work at a company, it becomes useless.

I mean, if you wanted to run a business there's better things to spend your time on: Wordpress, PHP, web stuff (JS/CSS) or if you really want more control, then use Ruby or Rails or Django.

But you're not a programmer unless you know about concepts like types, inheritance, concurrency, algorithms, data structures. Java IS a good place to start for both server and application development, C# for Windows, or maybe C++ for anything else.

The money is in these. Look up developer jobs: top skills are C++, C# (ASP / .NET), Java (Android).

TurtleCat
TurtleCat

@Deadlyinx
Udacity's intro to computer science and python basics are probably the best.. and they happen to be free

Coursera might be a distant second

Raving_Cute
Raving_Cute

copied from twitter:

HOW TO GET A SIX FIGURE CAREER AS A DEV IN ~ 18 MONTHS:

a. Decide where you want to live.
b. Check indeed/glassdoor for top dev salaries
c. Start learning top paying language from ground up. Read books on theory. Memorize API.
d. Build stuff. Start with tutorials then grow.
e. Learn basics of latest, trendy frameworks for CV keyword stuffing.
f. Build something useful.
g. Apply for jobs
h. ????
i. PROFIT

lostmypassword
lostmypassword

Learn Visual Basic. It will help you do more with Excel and, later, Access. These dummies pitching Python are assuming you can bootstrap an environment that Office programs already provide for you.

Snarelure
Snarelure

I work in IT recruitment. If you have the time and energy - seriously learn .NET or Java.

BinaryMan
BinaryMan

@Boy_vs_Girl
/g/ here. The best language for beginners is Java because it inherits styles from C/C++ while being the inspiration of styles in Javascript/Python. Basically, you get exposed to a little of everything in it.

It's not the easiest to learn, but you can learn practically anything if you learn Java first.

Emberfire
Emberfire

Javascript is insta-jobs m8.

@Deadlyinx
Read a python book there are plenty out there and it'll work you through the whole programming introduction. Pick a good book tho, there are a zillion python books out there

Java is mostly for future codemonkeys. Might land you a job but I don't think it'll ever be a good one.

@Raving_Cute
Underrated.
I too think it's best to
learn thoroughly
make something to show
learn incrementally

Raving_Cute
Raving_Cute

last question before i decide on which programming language to learn first;

ive always heard that python is a GOAT language for automating and scripting to make your job easier... is java as capable or useful to implement solutions at my job for these purposes?

Lunatick
Lunatick

@girlDog
this

w8t4u
w8t4u

I'd say start with Python to get your feet wet, then move on to Java once you feel comfortable.

Skullbone
Skullbone

Java is garbage.

Learn python for general programming.
R for statistics
Javascript for web dev
C++ for game dev or performance critical programs
Java/Swift for Mobile apps

Also I recommend either Clojure or Haskell to get a good grip on functional programming.

SniperWish
SniperWish

I used to meme Python, C++, and C, but now I am using Rust, Go, and Swift and I must say I am *very* satisfied for most things.

BinaryMan
BinaryMan

@SniperWish

I bet you have the most elegant hello world programs.

The only language on there ready for primetime is Go. Which is ok, but Erlang/Elixir is better for backend work where high concurrency is the goal.

Rust has no libraries and swift breaks its API every 5 months.

Burnblaze
Burnblaze

@Raving_Cute
no. python.

lostmypassword
lostmypassword

javascript #1 -for coding the actual website

so much shit will open up 2 u .
javascript is everywhere
java is a joke unless u already have an old job where they still use it.

/ html/ css - for look of website
sql - for storing info of website old fashion style
php - for storing info of website

will take u father than u will ever probably care 2 go

Poker_Star
Poker_Star

How much time does it take to learn Java from zero, practicing 2 hours a day approx?
And Phyton?

Sharpcharm
Sharpcharm

@Raving_Cute
This.

If I'm a lazy fuck who doesn't want to manually data slave every menial task, I should learn python right?

TurtleCat
TurtleCat

@Poker_Star

It really depends, but 2 hours a day is good and you will see results quickly.

JunkTop
JunkTop

@Sharpcharm
python would be useful, yes. or bash scripting, or even excel/access.

Techpill
Techpill

Good thread here.

Javascript sounds like the best for what I want, what would you guys recommend as a resource for learning it?

likme
likme

@Techpill
codecademy will guide you through to the point where you can make a simple game.

Evil_kitten
Evil_kitten

Please, help me get started.

I have 0 experience with coding, and I am willing to invest ~2 years of my life in coding.

I am interested in developing enterprise and game application on iOs.

I prefer 2D, i might need to use server of some sort (multiplayer, data storage, access ... )
I enjoy good, simple graphics, smooth usage,

Where do I go from here?

w8t4u
w8t4u

@Evil_kitten

OP here, should I go for HTML5, CSS and JavaScript?

Snarelure
Snarelure

can you make good money without a compsci/se degree and while being shit at maths?

seems to only option is to do web development and that area is flooded.

Need_TLC
Need_TLC

@Evil_kitten
if u wanna do all that , u should really focus on learning as much as u can about everything u possibly can . you will find out for urself what is truly important to ur needs thru trial and error and practical practice. it will be frustrating sometimes so remember, rome wasn't built in a day. .

i would start with Javascript (node.js, socketio, express dependancies, with mongodb,
maybe look into the google cloud, for hosting multiple vms' storage etc , its in its infancy but u should fuck around with it cuz they give u 300$ worth of free credits.

MPmaster
MPmaster

@Need_TLC

somebody just advised me to learn Java and LibGDX framework for my purpose. I decided creating small game apps for Android.

Do I still need Javascript here?

How does the whole thing add up?

TechHater
TechHater

@w8t4u
@Techpill
@lostmypassword
@Lord_Tryzalot
@girlDog

How can you be sure that Javascript isn't going to be replaced/outdated/outclassed by some more advanced programming language or even automated system. Sort of like happened with html, some 10-15 years are that was enough to create websites and earn good money. Now you can create a website on the internet, it will be very fast and free of charge.

Also isn't there just too much freelancers with full stack (js, html, css + some frameworks) and portfolio already? Think about India, Eastern Europe etc. Millions of programmers.
inb4 indian code
Yeah, i know, but JS is relatively easy to learn and that's why there is a shitload of competition, especially at entry levels.
The web-dev field is getting more and more saturated with each day, one day there won't be enough work for everyone.

Skullbone
Skullbone

@TechHater
if u wanna do all that , u should really focus on learning as much as u can about everything u possibly can

learn for yourself, dont ask for help unless u really need it because u dont know if u can trust the information.
most coding language is alike.

i say js. because it is efficient streamlined
and still extremely powerful
if u learn it u can learn anything else.
if u get into this , u will learn other languages.

i just recommend js first. its super fun immediatly useful, u can sanity check in google chrome web dev, and easily serve up a site on a local host just by opening ur html file. it goes deep into cool shit, u learn alot.
i know alot of languages (java, c# c++,python swfit,, but none are as cool or powerful as quickly and as practical as javascript. research its history and shit, its fascinating, its a great foundation .

get an app for ur phone and learn while u shit.

i recommend "sololearn"

they do a buncha languages, and when ur done u get a legit snazzy certificate signed by the ceo .

honestly i recommend u learn how 2 write ur own better programming language for ur own hardware u create.

look into ardunio

harvard has free computer sciences courses.

its a first step in a journey

no hacker is gonna take u seriously just by knowing javascript

unless maybe u have master prototypal inheritance and recursion and currying
and functions , and arguments
and can map out advanced math formulas
and solve problems but

then ur way ahead of the game.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z-OxzIC6pic&list=PLvJoKWRPIu8G6Si7LlvmBPA5rOJ9BA29R

one thing senpai. .u never stop learning, never stop pushing.

most of those coders

@TechHater
mentions , aren't business builders or innovators, there just button mashers they can do a basic job, thats not what u wanna do ...
or else just get a job sucking dicks.

Inmate
Inmate

@Skullbone
What are the best/most versatile frameworks to learn wise user? I already know python, JS, perl, HTML, and some PHP

Burnblaze
Burnblaze

@Evil_kitten
How dare you insult Coney Island ?

Emberburn
Emberburn

Learn c# better then java.

StonedTime
StonedTime

@massdebater
fucking kek.

FastChef
FastChef

@Inmate
if u know so much , write ur own.

be the change u want 2see.

Raving_Cute
Raving_Cute

@FastChef
Frameworks are garbage.

farquit
farquit

@FastChef
(Ip change because mobile)
My knowledge is more of a CS graduate understanding of things (ie: Breadth vs depth). I could probably do most things a project required, after spending an hour or two remembering how to do them exactly.
I'm an incredibly quick learner and understand complex algorithms, I just tend to have a problem remembering specific syntax.

PurpleCharger
PurpleCharger

@farquit
js syntax is incredibly simple.

im currently writing a frame work , that takes advantage of long polling and web sockets to create a sort of infinite loop of functional regression between clients and servers for more simple seemless asynch communication in a more logical and intuitive way than currently availiable, for my own proprietary finance and trade software, and a fun mmorpg im coding on the side.
but yea. why learn a frame work that isn't your own? there all written in basic javascript.

if u have a problem with html , maybe u could write your own framework that translates js to html.

theres alot of codes out there that do something similiar with regular text or document formatting.

Need_TLC
Need_TLC

@TechHater
I would think that JS will be around for a while. Of course mainly within frameworks and not native, but nevertheless should be around.

And regarding fullstack - I think everyone seeks out fullstack for some reason, especially at lower paying companies as they can't afford shit to pay for every role, so they just look for jack of all trades.

Sir_Gallonhead
Sir_Gallonhead

There is this faggot cunt who "learned" python from two O'Reilly books. "Introducing Python" and "Data Science from Scratch". This cunt went from being a retard frontend webdev to "data science" because of his fake skills and got a FUCKING 75% raise in salary.

Take from it what you want.

GoogleCat
GoogleCat

@Sir_Gallonhead
quit memeing monty python grandma

Booteefool
Booteefool

@Sir_Gallonhead
What was his original position and salary?
This is important because an increase from 3 free street poos a week to 5.25 free street poos a week might not be worth the trouble.

Raving_Cute
Raving_Cute

@girlDog
@Gigastrength
Just my opinion, but I HIGHLY disagree
I think Java is a waaay better language to learn as a beginner than python. Not even close in my opinion.

Crazy_Nice
Crazy_Nice

@Emberburn
What are the biggest differences between the who and what makes C# better in your opinion?

Does C# have stuff like pointers?

takes2long
takes2long

@PurpleCharger

What the fuck is the point of long polling when you already have a socket connection?

StonedTime
StonedTime

@Techpill
Learn HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. w3schools.com has some decent tutorials.

Spazyfool
Spazyfool

@takes2long
thats exactly the kinda thing non innovators ask .

Bidwell
Bidwell

Bumping for GNAWLEDGE

Crazy_Nice
Crazy_Nice

@TechHater
How can you be sure that Javascript isn't going to be replaced/outdated/outclassed by some more advanced programming language or even automated system.

once you know the fundamental logic of programming and the essential concepts then it doesn't matter. you can pick up any language in a few days. they all use the same loops and data structures and algorithms. stop worrying about what language is "best" and just start learning.

should I learn how to use a Phillips or a flathead screwdriver??

LuckyDusty
LuckyDusty

@Deadlyinx
what is the best resource to learn python?

Find a shitty half complete open source project that interests you and build off it. Don't pick an enormous and complicated project and don't worry about actually contributing just take it and run with it.
Less overwhelming than starting from scratch and you won't get hung up on something minor. Most of the syntax reference you need will already be on the screen. And when you add new features you still have to start from the ground up.

CodeBuns
CodeBuns

@Snarelure
QA automation. I write tcl scripts all day, besides domain specific knowledge the only programming skills are basic competency at code reuse. Object oriented model. And sometimes basic math, but usually that's for the domain specific thing.

I have a degree in IT and we never learned the fancy algorithms and big O. We did learn about database concurrency, but I forget all that. My friend does QA for a different company. Although unless you have some engineering or technical degree most places probably won't consider you.

I admit I do feel insecure not knowing so many fundamentals and want to learn, but there's just so much. And I can never bring myself to do it after work. I think what I may do is go for a CS masters.

@w8t4u
Yes, then learn php.

Poker_Star
Poker_Star

@CouchChiller
getting a job anywhere near machine learning without a PhD or a strong quantitative background with experience in data analysis or data science

Wew lad

PackManBrainlure
PackManBrainlure

@TreeEater
python useless for work at a company

You absolute wot m8

We use it for automation the whole fucking time, it's insanely useful. It's also the go-to language for Data Science (or any data jobs, for that matter) because it can do the same things as R and more besides

viagrandad
viagrandad

I want to learn programming and I keep picking up and dropping it again because I get halfway through some course and think: what happens after this?

I mean after learning some basics you clearly don't go right into looking for paid work. I imagine you wouldn't really get anywhere trying to contribute to some grand open source project either. I guess the general answer is further study and practice but it's not like I have any ideas for anything in between. So what do?

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