High yield dividend list: 8/26 - 9/9

BlogWobbles
BlogWobbles

High dividend yield list for August 26th to September 9th. Please remember that you must buy stock the day before the ex-dividend date, not the day of. The cutoff for listing a return yield is 7% in these lists. Please take close note of the vitality of individual stocks around previous ex-dividend dates. It is important to do your own due-diligence. Dividend history can be found here:

http://www.nasdaq.com/quotes/dividend-history.aspx

The list is currently as follows.

Stage Stores, Inc. (SSI), Ex-dividend (EX-D) date 8/26, Payment date 9/14, 9.7% yield.

Atlantica Yield plc (ABY), EX-D date 8/29, Payment date 9/15, 8.93% yield.

American Capital Agency Corp. (AGNC), EX-D date 8/29, Payment date 9/9, 12.03% yield.

Ellington Financial LLC (EFC), EX-D date 8/30, Payment date 9/15, 11.186% yield.

Whitestone REIT (WSR), EX-D date 8/30, Payment date 9/9, 7.7% yield.

First Trust/Aberdeen Global Opportunity Income Fund (SENPAI), EX-D date 9/1, Payment date 9/15, 7.58% yield.

Itau Unibanco Banco Holding SA (ITUB), EX-D date 9/1, Payment date 10/11, 13.5% yield.

Fidus Investment Corporation (FDUS), EX-D date 9/7, Payment date 9/23, 9.73% yield.

Garrison Capital Inc. (GARS), EX-D date 9/7, Payment date 9/23, 13.5% yield.

All urls found in this thread:
http://www.nasdaq.com/quotes/dividend-history.aspx
http://www.investopedia.com/articles/stocks/07/dividend_implications.asp
http://www.investopedia.com/articles/stocks/11/dividend-capture-strategy.asp
http://rfs.oxfordjournals.org/content/7/4/711.short
http://people.stern.nyu.edu/eelton/working_papers/marginal_effects.pdf
http://finance.yahoo.com/quote/ITUB?p=ITUB
PurpleCharger
PurpleCharger

@BlogWobbles
fuck u faggot

StrangeWizard
StrangeWizard

@PurpleCharger
No need for being mean.

Illusionz
Illusionz

@StrangeWizard
no need for being mean
Are you sure?
This is the same foolproof strategy you were shilling in another thread that died.

Raving_Cute
Raving_Cute

@Illusionz
It isn't fullproof at all, and it isn't shilling. I make my money this way, and I was simply trying to share my findings for the next two weeks. If you aren't interested then you can move along.

Booteefool
Booteefool

i have something that's giving me 3000% a year
you'll never find it, either

King_Martha
King_Martha

Could just put your money in VTI or VOO. instead of falling for this "FOOL PROOF METHOD OF NOT BEING A KEK" and getting cucked and being a cuck.

farquit
farquit

@Raving_Cute
fullproof
I don't know what that means, but you certainly are shilling this crap.
And if you believe in "If you aren't interested, move along", maybe you can explain why you're birthing another shitty thread when no one cared about the first one?

viagrandad
viagrandad

@BlogWobbles
lol not knowing that a company's price drops on the ex-div date by the same amount of the dividend. So a company is trading at $10 prior to ex-div date. You buy it for $10. On ex-div date they pay out 10% dividend of $1, and stock price falls to $9. There is no free lunch kids.
http://www.investopedia.com/articles/stocks/07/dividend_implications.asp
"When a dividend is paid, several things can happen. The first of these is changes to the price of the security and various items tied to it. On the ex-dividend date, the stock price is adjusted downward by the amount of the dividend by the exchange on which the stock trades. For most dividends this is usually not observed amidst the up and down movements of a normal day's trading. It becomes easily apparent, however, on the ex-dividend dates for larger dividends, such as the $3 payment made by Microsoft in the fall of 2004, which caused shares to fall from $29.97 to $27.34.

The reason for the adjustment is that the amount paid out in dividends no longer belongs to the company and this is reflected by a reduction in the company's market cap. Instead, it belongs to the individual shareholders. For those purchasing shares after the ex-dividend date, they no longer have a claim to the dividend, so the exchange adjusts the price downward to reflect this fact."

cum2soon
cum2soon

@farquit
The other thread wasn't completed, this is complete for the next two weeks. I'm simply trying to share what I found with other people. You investing in any of these stocks will have 0% impact on them. Unless you're some magic millionaire or something, but considering most of Veeky Forums is newer to investments, I'm pretty sure you investing will not have an impact. I'm simply trying to be friendly and share what I found. Seriously, if you aren't interested, then just move along. I'm not harming anyone in any way, and I'm not telling you to invest in some magic stock that'll moon for no reason. Check these stocks and their stock history, the dividend yield is accurate as is the information I have posted. I thought some people would be interested.

lostmypassword
lostmypassword

@cum2soon
Maybe you can explain to this @viagrandad
guy how you can avoid having the drop in value happen to you by "doing your research and checking the stock activity around dividend dates", like you said in the other thread.

Poker_Star
Poker_Star

@viagrandad
So in theory, every single dividend here should have a fall of equal percentage to the dividend paid. Meaning the stock value of AGNC should fall exactly 12% after 8/29, correct? Same with ITUB and GARS, which should both fall exactly 13.5%.

Methshot
Methshot

@Poker_Star
Those percentages are annualized. You'll have to adjust them for whatever the dividend payment period, is, probably quarterly.

SomethingNew
SomethingNew

@viagrandad
be investor
buy dividend stock
stock falls by % of dividend paid
government takes % of dividend payment
literally lose money with each and every dividend
Must suck to be investors.

hairygrape
hairygrape

@BlogWobbles
do not fall for the dividend meme.

AwesomeTucker
AwesomeTucker

@hairygrape
Dividends are literally pure money loss. Way for businesses to pay the government and screw the investors.

CodeBuns
CodeBuns

@Raving_Cute
I make my money this way
No you don't. What you get in dividends is always offset by the decline in the stock price on the same day, sometimes more.

Buying dividends is always a losing strategy because of the transaction costs and taxes. It's been studied a million times.

If we had mods, you'd be banned for shilling this bullshit.

Raving_Cute
Raving_Cute

@viagrandad
@CodeBuns
A hypothetical share could be trading at $20 before the ex-date and the shareholders are entitled to an upcoming quarterly dividend of $0.25. On the ex-date, the price of the stock should drop to $19.75 but those investors only buying the shares now are no longer entitled to the dividend distribution. Basically, an investor can buy the stock for $20, hold it for one day and sell it on the ex-date for $19.75 and still receive payment on thepayment date. The potential to generate quick accessreturnsstems from the phenomenon whereby the stock fails to fall to $19.75 as theory would suggest, and even when the predicted fall actually does occur, the shares recoup their value shortly thereafter.

http://www.investopedia.com/articles/stocks/11/dividend-capture-strategy.asp

Please respond.

Lord_Tryzalot
Lord_Tryzalot

@Raving_Cute
Because investors purchasing the stocks on the ex-date no longer receive the dividend, theshare priceshould theoretically fall by the price of the dividend amount. In practice this does not always happen. Depending on the price movement, shares are then sold immediately on the ex-date or when the price bounces back to its original value.

SomethingNew
SomethingNew

@Raving_Cute
@Lord_Tryzalot
@Raving_Cute
@Lord_Tryzalot
Fair enough, it looks legit. Not what I expected, but looking at OP I can see the logic and warning. I guess you really did your research.

Bidwell
Bidwell

@Raving_Cute
The statement "the shares recoup their value shortly thereafter" is conclusory, unsupported, and mostly untrue.

Dividend stripping has been studied time and again, and proven to be an ineffective and losing strategy.

http://rfs.oxfordjournals.org/content/7/4/711.short
http://people.stern.nyu.edu/eelton/working_papers/marginal_effects.pdf

Also, to be clear, the fall in the stock price isn't exactly 1:1 because of taxes. In reality, the decline in the stock price exactly offsets the actual realized gain of the investor realizing the dividend. It's literally a zero sum game that you cannot win. At best, with zero transaction costs, you might break even in the long run.

Evilember
Evilember

@CodeBuns
Buying dividends is always a losing strategy because of the transaction costs and taxes
A million times this. There is a reason it's against the law for agents to sell dividends...

TechHater
TechHater

@CodeBuns
shilling this bullshit
Well, according to him, he's not shilling anything.
And apparently, you can make sure your stocks don't fall on dividend day by "doing research".

Nojokur
Nojokur

@Evilember

Eh. Not always, if you invest in high dividend muncipal bonds that are tax free for you (funds that are in your state), you can avoid taxes on it. If you have a free dividend reinvestment program with your broker who does fractional shares, then its not so bad.

But if you are paying taxes and have to pay a broker fee every time you reinvest, its terrible.

Fried_Sushi
Fried_Sushi

@cum2soon
thank you man. feel free to share whatever you want. ignore haters.

Evil_kitten
Evil_kitten

i think it's great that OP started this thread.. so many people come in here just to bash, thats sad.

I don't have a whole portfolio of Dividend stocks but i have a few monthly etfs and stocks in my portfolio that i plan on leaving in their for atleast a year. There are also some speculation stocks in my portfolio and some S&P500 and DJIA stocks in it aswell.

If you don't want to talk about OPs portfolio then you are free to leave the thread and maybe even start your own shit thread.

Veeky Forums is full of bashers for NO REASON holy shit!!

happy_sad
happy_sad

@Evil_kitten
You're a fucking idiot. We're not bashing OP's portfolio, or even the concept of buying dividend-paying stocks for long-term appreciation and accumulation.

We're specifically pointing out that OP's proposed strategy of buying dividend stocks immediately prior to the ex-dividend date is a losing play.

If you're too stupid to understand the discussion, don't jump in and white knight just because you see the word "dividends" and think you have to defend this somehow. Fucking retard.

iluvmen
iluvmen

@BlogWobbles

Stage Stores, Inc. (SSI), Ex-dividend (EX-D) date 8/26, Payment date 9/14, 9.7% yield.

Closed yesterday at $5.97. Today (dividend day) SSI fell almost 20% to $5.67 at the open.
Currently trading at $5.71

Guess you "didn't do your research" on that one, huh OP?
How much did you buy to capture those sweet dividends?

lostmypassword
lostmypassword

@iluvmen
Whoops, 5%.

TurtleCat
TurtleCat

@CodeBuns

buy dynamic growth share
company becomes successful and starts paying better dividends each year
make money
???

You're a retard. Don't forget kids, warren buffett prefers to hold his shares forever.

BunnyJinx
BunnyJinx

@TurtleCat
buy dynamic growth share
company becomes successful and starts paying better dividends each year
If it's a growth stock, then it's not going to be paying dividends. Growth stocks, by definition, pay out little to no distributions because they funnel that money back into the business to fuel growth and expansion.

Also, invoking Warren Buffett or any other "star" investor is usually a sign that you're too stupid to make an argument yourself. Since I'm not even sure what you're advocating here, I'm going to go ahead and say my impression is correct.

Stupidasole
Stupidasole

@BunnyJinx

My argument, and I'll make it simple for your benefit, is that capturing dividends is a fine way to go, and it can be done even if you're buying dynamic growth shares.

If a growth company grows in earnings per share by 20% year on year and the dividend rises each year, if you have a good number of shares you will be laughing at what a good buy you made eventually.

Not only that of course, but the capital appreciation because of the growing share price means you can even feel good if you end up having to sell.

I don't just invoke warren buffett, but every good investor, and every authoritative text on investing. People shouldn't try to time markets. If a company is in a strong financial position, buy and hold.

Playboyize
Playboyize

@Stupidasole
capturing dividends is a fine way to go
Define "capturing dividend."

If you mean buying and holding a diverse portfolio of stocks that happen to pay dividends, then fucking duh. No one ever said that dividends were bad.

If you mean intentionally skewing your portfolio towards dividend-paying stocks, then you're probably making some very tax-inefficient decisions that are going to undermine your long-term accumulation. But that's a subject for another thread.

If you mean dividend tripping, like OP is advocating, then you're just as retarded as him, for reasons that have been explained ad nauseum.

If a growth company grows in earnings per share by 20% year on year and the dividend rises each year,
You clearly have no fucking clue what "growth company" means. Stocks with rising dividends are most certainly not growth companies. Jesus H. Christ, this board.

I can tell you mean well, and yes buy-and-hold is the correct strategy, but you really need to work on your education. First, you can't correctly articulate your thoughts or even use simple financial terms properly. Second, you erroneously think that you're somehow disagreeing with something I said earlier in the thread. Please stop making a fool of yourself; you give a bad impression of long-term investors when you act this way.

Methnerd
Methnerd

@viagrandad
Preferreds have a call date, so current equity is usually a moot point.

GoogleCat
GoogleCat

@Booteefool
i have something that's giving me 3000% a year
you'll never find it, ether

ftfy

New_Cliche
New_Cliche

couple questions about why OP might be right.

1. Major downside is taxes. Buying dividends in Roth IRA?
2. Buy dividend. Price goes down proportionally. Hold for a month. Price sometimes goes up?

why not.

Spamalot
Spamalot

@New_Cliche
1. Major downside is taxes. Buying dividends in Roth IRA?
Avoids the tax problem, but not the transaction cost problem. And even without either, you're still at break-even, at best. No one invests to break even.
2. Buy dividend. Price goes down proportionally. Hold for a month. Price sometimes goes up?
If the price was gonna go up, then the price was gonna go up. Sometimes it will. Other times it won't. If you knew with 100% certainty that the price was gonna go up (which you never can), then you'd buy the stock REGARDLESS of the dividend. It's a separate question from whether buying the dividend is a smart move.

likme
likme

@Spamalot
1. $8 is not equal to a 2.5% quarterly payout unless you're investing < $320 which maybe most of Veeky Forums is, but I'm not. Or even $16 entry and exit is still less than my dividend payout would be. How are you still at break even? that's just patently false as a blanket statement. I get that you could make more % in another investment, but this is just a theoretical exercise.

2. You didn't provide any reason this scenario wouldn't work. Assuming a 50% up/down probability (just for theory), Half the time you get the dividend and break-even or lose slightly and half the time you get dividend and sell at break even or a little more. Also depends on how long you're willing to hold.

Emberfire
Emberfire

@likme
1. I have no idea where these number came from. Probably from your ass.

2. In you example, it's less than 50-50% because the price has already dropped by the time you get the dividend. The price doesn't magically pop back to the prior level. Sometime it does, sometimes it doesn't. You're assuming every stock goes up, which is demonstrably false.

Flameblow
Flameblow

@Emberfire
which is why you look at dividend history and see if it has a history of quickly rebounding or not
Back to OP's original statements. You just came full circle.

TalkBomber
TalkBomber

@Flameblow
I'm OP btw.

WebTool
WebTool

@Flameblow
if it has a history of quickly rebounding or not
If it had such a history (doubtful) it'd either be because of the market conditions as a whole (high tide raises all ships) or because it's a strong stock that was going to increase in price anyway, Either way, you'd make more money just going long on the stock than doing the stupid dividend stripping play.

StonedTime
StonedTime

@WebTool
Here's today's chart for the first stock OP picked, SSI.
I can't tell if it has a "history of rebounding" or not,

CodeBuns
CodeBuns

@BlogWobbles
Itau Unibanco Banco Holding SA

it is not as high as you claim it to be (I just randomly checked one). And even if it manages to pay their 0.5% monthly, it only adds up to 6.5%

StrangeWizard
StrangeWizard

@CodeBuns

http://finance.yahoo.com/quote/ITUB?p=ITUB

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