Hey Veeky Forums

King_Martha
King_Martha

Hey Veeky Forums.
I dropped out of my econ bach in a Japanese Uni and went home to my home country. I left with very basic economic and financial knowledge, but impecable language skills and cultural insight.
I'm aware that very few foreigners speak and read as fluently as I do and I would like to capitalize on it in some way. Any pointers on what industries would be a good place to look for employment opportunities?

All urls found in this thread:
http://www.appliedmedical.com/Careers/Culture.aspx
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daisaku_Ikeda
viagrandad
viagrandad

@King_Martha
What technique did you use for kani?

5mileys
5mileys

hey user,

Sorry, can't help you there but, why not find a job in JP? Also which uni did you go to, thinking of applying myself.

cum2soon
cum2soon

@viagrandad
kanji*

Carnalpleasure
Carnalpleasure

@King_Martha
English teacher

Emberburn
Emberburn

@King_Martha
Thicc

Emberfire
Emberfire

@viagrandad
I studied Japanese about 1 year in a cram school, wich helped alot with grammar, but they mostly teach Kanji in a pace too quick to remember properly.
I spent around 1.5 month studying it by myself. What you should do is ignore anything said on Veeky Forums (it's mostly nonsense), and do the following.
Pick a news article of adequate difficulty (it's ok if its a bit too hard), read through it once or twice first and then go back and mark every kanji/word you don't understand. Write them down, reherse what you don't understand untill you remember them (took me around 20-40 mins depending on article). Then proceed on rereading the article and try to make sense out of it. Do this once a day adjusting your level as you go.
I read Japanese quicker than english now.

@5mileys
Waseda Univ

New_Cliche
New_Cliche

@Emberfire
Thanks, I'll try this. Seems a lot better than memorizing kanji in a vacuum like most people suggest.

Ignoramus
Ignoramus

@Emberfire

Did you have a job while working there? If so, how hard was it to get a working visa? Currently looking at a few Japanese language schools in Tokyo.

Stupidasole
Stupidasole

@Ignoramus
While studying*

Snarelure
Snarelure

@Emberfire

Try medical sales such as "Applied Medical"
http://www.appliedmedical.com/Careers/Culture.aspx

That's what I'm doing now after studying in China for 5 years

TurtleCat
TurtleCat

@Emberfire
Looks like your ass is gonna be in the JET program or its equivalent.

Waseda's good (I almost studied there for a little bit myself!), but dropping out isn't good, and especially for a bachelor's. There's no getting around the fact that you're going to be fighting uphill, regardless of whether you work in Japan or in America. "Language skills and cultural insight" are valuable, but keep in mind that in Asia that job description makes you (1) yet another teacher or (2) the obligatory white potted plant. Thankfully, that latter part is a bit less prevalent in Japan as it is in China.

The best option for you is the same option for a lot of people who can speak Japanese: JET or something like it. Given your proficiency, they'll likely pay you better and stick you in a highschool. Problem is, it's likely they'll stick you somewhere remote - if the JET program is like what it used to be, they take their high performers and send 'em out to the inaka to one-man-band English classes. That'd be a good opportunity for you to unfuck yourself, take online courses, and generally try to recover.

With all of that said, you're an absolute goddamn fool if you don't finish some sort of degree. Even the guys I know WITH degrees struggled to do anything but JET. I used to work in Tokyo for a while, and trust me, there are plenty of people with the language skills who also stuck it out in school.

DeathDog
DeathDog

@Ignoramus
My knowledge of the situation is very old, but when I traveled there on a student visa, working was 110% verboten. I ended up tutoring English to Japanese women a little bit when I was there, but did so for free because I couldn't risk it.

You can apply for a sort of addendum to the visa that allows you to work there, but I knew very few people who did. With that said, I've never gotten the impression that it was extremely difficult, though the people had job offers already lined up.

Techpill
Techpill

@DeathDog

Thanks for the suggestion.

I need to save about $10,000 over a few months before I can apply for a student visa. It's good too because I will have a bit to live off of for a few months until I get the working permit figured out.

Like @Emberfire
I have no college degree, but I do have about 5 years in the medical field as a physical aide and medical sales. I know the Japanese government is very strict on handing out working visas unless you at least have a 4 year equivalent.

Current plan is to go to a language school, get a student visa, apply for the working permit and work part time up to 28 hours. Anyone do this before?

While I'd love to finish a degree and find a job the easy way, time is really the issue.

Emberburn
Emberburn

@DeathDog
I spent a semester in Tokyo last year and the exchange students were offered paid jobs as English (or Russian or Hindi etc.) conversationalists at the school. I didn't end up signing up for it, but I know that all we had to do is put in some extra paperwork to get work permission.

SniperGod
SniperGod

@Emberburn
Which school was this?

SniperWish
SniperWish

@SniperGod
Souka University in Hachioji.
Beautiful campus, very friendly people, but it's run by a cult so you can't really tell outsiders you go there or they'll assume you worship this guy: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daisaku_Ikeda

StonedTime
StonedTime

Changed to my phone.

Thanks user, really appreciate this advice.

I will shoot them an email and see if they can help me out. Any more info I should know about the school?

VisualMaster
VisualMaster

@SniperWish
Changed devices again, upon further research it seems pretty tough to get in to. And I bet the tuition isn't cheap. Not sure how I could pay for this unfortunately... = /

FastChef
FastChef

@VisualMaster
Can't help you there. They have an exchange program with my school in the US, so I don't know anything about the application process.
But I remember some of the international students were non-degree students who were just there for language courses, so you might be able to try that if that's your main goal. I thought the language course I took was pretty good; the professors cannot speak more than elementary English so you are forced to use Japanese.

Boy_vs_Girl
Boy_vs_Girl

@FastChef
Just send in an application. Hopefully they will get back to me soon. Thanks again. Very much appreciated.

StonedTime
StonedTime

@King_Martha
HOLY SHIT MY DICK IS ON FIRE
THICCCCCC

#IMWITHHER

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