I just received an email saying "my application has been received" for a credit...

likme
likme

I just received an email saying "my application has been received" for a credit card that I didn't apply for. Should I call my primary bank first or this bank?

All urls found in this thread:
http://www.illinoisattorneygeneral.gov/consumers/hotline.html
https://www.texasattorneygeneral.gov/cpd/identity-theft
https://oag.ca.gov/idtheft/facts/victim-checklist
https://oag.ca.gov/idtheft
http://www.mass.gov/ago/consumer-resources/consumer-information/scams-and-identity-theft/identity-theft/attorney-generals-guide-to-id-theft-for.html
http://myfloridalegal.com/pages.nsf/0/CBBEBA3F2583433385256DBA004BC600?OpenDocument
http://www.ksrevenue.org/faqs-dmvdl.html
http://www.themcfox.com/THE-NET/identity-theft/7-check-bank-fraud.htm
http://www.bobpearce.com/_Identity%20Theft/Identity%20Theft%20Disc%20CD%20ROM/Student%20Manual/index.htm
http://www.usarec.army.mil/downloads/hq/HRD/SFA/ConsumerGuideToGoodCredit.pdf
http://www.experian.com/blogs/ask-experian/credit-education/preventing-fraud/victim-assistance/
http://juliebestry.com/2009/10/27/who-knows-your-secrets-part-2-checking-up-on-your-checking-history/
https://www.usbank.com/cgi_w/cfm/personal/achieve_goals/id_theft.cfm
https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/features/feature-0014-identity-theft
https://www.justice.gov/criminal-fraud/identity-theft/identity-theft-and-identity-fraud
massdebater
massdebater

@likme
call and see what the fuck is going on. could be someone trying to use your identity.

likme
likme

@likme
additional credit is good especially if you don't go crazy buying things. you should follow the link and give them all your info

Snarelure
Snarelure

@massdebater
I'm going to start by calling the bank issuing this new credit card. But then what order of operations should I take after that?

Call my bank? Freeze my credit?

SniperGod
SniperGod

I would be cautious of the email as well. They could be trying to scam you by thinking youre getting scammed. scamception type shit.

Crazy_Nice
Crazy_Nice

@SniperGod
This
Op's bank might be in on it. I read about a scam like that. You have to talk to people in person your calls and emails can be intercepted redirected

Lord_Tryzalot
Lord_Tryzalot

@SniperGod
This was actually my first thought. This could be a phishing attempt to get you to email or call the scammer and cough up some personal info.

It could also be a shady marketing attempt by a less scrupulous credit card marketer. Like those " you were pretty approved" letters.

Could also be an actual case of Id theft.

Here is how you proceed. First, secure any other accounts you have. Call in to check for access or attempted access or transactions

Then Call the bank issuing the new card. DO NOT CALL THE NUMBER IN THE EMAIL, OR FROM THE WEBSITE THE EMAIL LINKS TO. These could be redirects. Look up the banks number somewhere else then call them to get to the bottom of it. If it turns out this was a marketing attempt, throw a fucking fit about it and tell them to fuck off. If not, congrats, you just beat a scammer.

If it is a scammer, call in to any accounts you have and wipe the passwords / pins/ challange questions for reset.

If this is a scammer that actually had your personal info to open an account, mention this to your banks, as they generally have enhanced security measures you can activate to make access more difficult.

massdebater
massdebater

@Lord_Tryzalot
I have text message alerts on my phone and haven't seen anything.

The email seems legitimate but contains no contact information. I googled the bank and found their support number from their official site. It's Barclays and I'm american.

Emberfire
Emberfire

UPDATE: Just spoke with someone from the bank issuing the card and they terminated the application and suggested I call Transunion.

They said the application information was filed from a different address outside of my state and the state I previously lived in. I need to send them a fax and they mail me the application information used.

New_Cliche
New_Cliche

@Emberfire
Transunion
Be sure to call all three credit reporting agencies, not just one. If the scammers tried opening one account, they may try (or have tried) to open others. You want a fraud alert on all of your credit reports.

Also, and you might need to wait a few weeks for this, but get a copy of your full credit report from all three agencies. Check the accounts listed carefully and be sure there are no credit accounts opened that you don't recognize.

Lastly, I wouldn't bother changing all your passwords and doing stupid stuff like that. You weren't hacked. All the scammers had was your name, address and a little bit of personal information about you, like an employer, place of birth, old address, etc -- all of which can be obtained from a public facebook profile, for example.

Nojokur
Nojokur

@New_Cliche
All the scammers had was your name, address and a little bit of personal information about you, like an employer, place of birth, old address, etc -- all of which can be obtained from a public facebook profile, for example.
they need your SSN to open a credit account.

he may or may not be hacked, but someone with his private info certainly was/is.

Fried_Sushi
Fried_Sushi

@likme
You need to freeze for credit asap

SomethingNew
SomethingNew

@Emberfire
Good thing you caught that. You would still be wise to follow up like previously mentioned. If they had enough info to make that application they might try it again, or change tactics and start trying to access accounts. I work in this field and these fuckers are relentless. Sometimes they will call 15 times a day trying to get different people in different departments to milk enough info to gain account access. Or they will get personal info, then just run it though every major bank hoping to get lucky and find an accounto.

The person doing this just sits around and scams. They have all the time in the world so they very often just keep trying over and over.

I would throw extra security on all my accounts if I were you.

5mileys
5mileys

@New_Cliche
@Nojokur
At what point should I consider filing a police report?

iluvmen
iluvmen

@5mileys
Hate to say it but don't count on the police caring much. Google around, some states AG offices has ID fraud reporting

TreeEater
TreeEater

@likme
sometimes the banks just send you a card that you activate or not. if you do they send you the paperwork. nasty shit.

Burnblaze
Burnblaze

@Lord_Tryzalot
Exactly what this user says.

Call the issuing bank on a trusted number. It's probably a phishing scam.

Ignoramus
Ignoramus

@5mileys
At what point should I consider filing a police report?
I wouldn't bother. The real victim in these scams is the credit card companies, who extend loans to the scammers and then don't get repaid. Since you're not financially liable for these fake accounts, the only damage you suffer is to your credit rating (which can be fixed) and your time/hassle/annoyance (which can be substantial). The credit card companies will work directly with law enforcement if there's anything that they feel can be done.

The only reason for you to file a police report is if you actually suffered a financial loss (i.e., your bank accounts were cleared out), which is EXTREMELY rare. At that point you'd be calling your insurance company and the police. But for simple credit fraud? Don't bother. It literally happens thousands of times a day all over the world.

Supergrass
Supergrass

@Emberfire
@5mileys
@iluvmen
You need to file a police report. Not because the police care, but because having that report activates/opens up more laws to legally help you such as for example there are laws that say you can freeze/unfreeze your credit reports for free if you have a police report.

Spazyfool
Spazyfool

@Supergrass
@Emberfire

Place security freezes AND fraud alerts

you should place a freeze on your credit file at each of the national credit reporting agencies (Equifax, Experian, TransUnion, and Innovis). you will need to do this with all these credit reporting agencies. It'll add another step when you try to open a credit card or get a loan, but it also makes it impossible for someone to use your ssn to do anything without using a pin. with the police report the agencies will wave the normal fee. and get a report from all three.

create an ID theft report with the FTC (Federal Trade Commission) and you will receive an Identity Theft Affidavit, which can be used to file a police report and create an ID Theft Report.
your identity theft affidavit together with your police report become your official identity theft report, and is used by the credit reporting agencies and creditors to verify your claim of identity theft
mail your identity theft report to each of the credit reporting bureaus and request an extended fraud alert. it will entitle you to two free reports per year and removal of your name off of marketing lists for prescreened offers. this will prevent prescreened credit offers from landing in your mailbox where they can be stolen

here is another police ereport anecdote from when someone had their personal info stolen
Get a police report that says your ssn was stolen. I had a collections agency after me from fraudulent accounts, the minute i sent them a copy of my police report, they left me alone.

get your Chex Systems and TeleCheck reports. This report will show you if someone has opened a new checking account in your name. and also place a fraud alert and security freeze on your consumer file, just like with a credit report. this is a lesser known vulnerability, but one that can be even more costly to ignore than the credit freeze. identity thieves open bank accounts so place a security freeze on your chexsystems and telecheck bank account reports.

Dreamworx
Dreamworx

@Spazyfool
get an IRS tax pin so someone can't file a fake tax return in your name in an attempt to get a refund. file Form 14039 IRS identity theft affidavit. the IRS will send you a PIN. you will receive a new PIN each year. and get your tax transcript report from them.

get an statement from Social Security called the Personal Earnings and Benefit Statement and if someone is using your SSN (like to get a job)

security questions were developed years ago, when breaches were rare and mainstream system developers did not anticipate that your mother's maiden name could be exposed. In practice, this means that security questions should be treated similarly to passwords. change your website security challenge question answers to something you cant find in public record, or facebook, or linkedin, etc

check with your banks to increase security such as disable wire transfers out, reduce ACH withdrawal limits per day, and per week, disable web access, require certain measure, such as two factor authentication, etc.

closely monitor your mailbox where you receive paper mail, mail theft is a common part of fraud. for increased security have your important / sensitive mail sent to a PO box because its harder to steal from that than a regular mailbox

Sir_Gallonhead
Sir_Gallonhead

@Dreamworx
your state probably has a website too with info specific for that state. few examples I found

http://www.illinoisattorneygeneral.gov/consumers/hotline.html
Attorney General Lisa Madigan created the first-ever Illinois Identity Theft Hotline. The hotline provides Illinoisans who have been victimized by identity theft with one-on-one assistance as they work to report the crime to local law enforcement and financial institutions, repair their credit, and prevent future problems.

https://www.texasattorneygeneral.gov/cpd/identity-theft

https://oag.ca.gov/idtheft/facts/victim-checklist
https://oag.ca.gov/idtheft

http://www.mass.gov/ago/consumer-resources/consumer-information/scams-and-identity-theft/identity-theft/attorney-generals-guide-to-id-theft-for.html
Attorney General's Guide to ID Theft for Victims and Consumers

http://myfloridalegal.com/pages.nsf/0/CBBEBA3F2583433385256DBA004BC600?OpenDocument
Attorney General of Florida Identity Theft Victim Kit

http://www.ksrevenue.org/faqs-dmvdl.html
info regarding stolen Kansas drivers license and Victims of Identity Theft

massdebater
massdebater

@Sir_Gallonhead

http://www.themcfox.com/THE-NET/identity-theft/7-check-bank-fraud.htm

http://www.bobpearce.com/_Identity%20Theft/Identity%20Theft%20Disc%20CD%20ROM/Student%20Manual/index.htm

http://www.usarec.army.mil/downloads/hq/HRD/SFA/ConsumerGuideToGoodCredit.pdf
page 89 Steps to Take If Your Identity is Stolen

http://www.experian.com/blogs/ask-experian/credit-education/preventing-fraud/victim-assistance/

http://juliebestry.com/2009/10/27/who-knows-your-secrets-part-2-checking-up-on-your-checking-history/

https://www.usbank.com/cgi_w/cfm/personal/achieve_goals/id_theft.cfm
What To Do If You Suspect Identity Theft

https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/features/feature-0014-identity-theft

https://www.justice.gov/criminal-fraud/identity-theft/identity-theft-and-identity-fraud
What Should I Do If I've Become a Victim of Identity Theft?

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