MAKE BIZ GREAT AGAIN - Stocks General Board (NO ROBUNH0oOD)

iluvmen
iluvmen

I am sick and tired of biz becoming the stomping ground for r9k users. Something fruitful
Criterias:
Anything below $3> do not list
NO dogcoins, bitcoins, shitcoins, trollcoins
It's ok to just provide a stock by itself without explanation but it would be highly appreciated
leave ebay flipping, or snarky comments on how better to use those funds out, we get it you get it, but we don't care and will stick to muh stocks
Leeching is fine AS long as it concern stocks, none of that poor pleb begging for entrepreneur ideas

That aside: Here's some of my assumptions:

Global consumer data is going to be dismal, will be seeing that sometimes November.

DB and DBK (worst offender) will not fail this year, we got shilled, time to move on

Energy might or might not also go up due WINTERISCOMINGHODOR with help of a strong dollar. And dollar will probably remain strong due I have a strong inclination that banks will sour their own data to force Yalen to chicken while Eurobucks, Yuan, will all slip various reason or the other. Yen is a joke -> . <-

Some of my current portfolio:
ORCL (Stable, the lack of volatility plus reasonable performance is a comfort stock for me)
XLE (ETF Oil, yes energy but we know it's oil, energy hype, I'm too insecure to not invest in) VDE (ETF Oil, same)

FRA:DBK (Fresh off the dead cat, going to dump soon, learner from DB:AG back September )
GSLC (GoldmanSachs Equity Frankenstein, volatile but surprisingly predictable, as always, sell before drop, duh)
CVX (Overvalued piece of crap, but running on hype, will sell soon)

Fed rate decision nov 2

Previous Thread: >>1573291

Bidwell
Bidwell

@iluvmen

There are national banks here trading shares for less than $3. That rule is dumb m8. Anyone have any shares they want analysed?

lostmypassword
lostmypassword

@Bidwell
That rule is dumb m8
Not at all.
It's not to say you can't profit from OTC/cheap stocks, but anything that low priced is far more subject to manipulation and wild volatility, plus the added risk of collapse.
You're much safer with higher priced stocks that are listed on a major exchange as well.

Playboyize
Playboyize

@Bidwell
Any opinions on imax? This years movie season was pretty shit, but next year will have lots of good movies and i see potential for growth there not to mention they've been opening lots of new locations.

Methshot
Methshot

@lostmypassword

You're right, but we can't neglect discussion of small-cap shares invested in for growth potential

@Playboyize
Well their revenues are growing year on year, cash and receivables growing nicely too, current assets are far in excess of current liabilities which is good.

Cash flow is growing too which is really encouraging. Their EPS history over the years is a bit shaky, and since the shares aren't paying a dividend I'm not sure whether I'd want to get into them.

I like to see EPS going up, ideally with no fall in the last 5 years of reports, maybe 1 fall which allows for something strange happening. The P/E ratio is 50 which means it isn't really a bargain.

I certainly wouldn't invest in this company, but that's my take on it.

Snarelure
Snarelure

@Methshot
growth potential
If there's such likely potential present in them, then why do major exchanges delist them when they reach that level?
Are you suggesting they're shooting themselves (and possible investors) in the foot by depriving them of these profitable opportunities?
Or is it more likely that the risk inherent in them outweighs the possible growth, and they're merely making the smart decision?

Firespawn
Firespawn

@Snarelure

Well here in the UK we have the FTSE 100 which lists the biggest 100 companies, then the FTSE 250 and the alternative investment market (AIM) which list a lot of small and mid-cap companies not big enough for the FTSE 100, so there is a huge amount of these companies to choose from here.

I assume that there are also alternative investment markets for the american exchanges

LuckyDusty
LuckyDusty

@Firespawn
Yes, the OTC markets are similar to what you describe, but that's the whole point.
These markets have almost no regulation or transparency, meaning almost no protection for investors. This is why the major exchanges will not list these companies, as the atmosphere has been described as casino like, and standard practices like financial disclosure are weak or absent entirely.
Two guys in an office can create a "company" that is little more than a shell, but satisfactory by these market standards, leaving investors incredibly vulnerable to malfeasance or outright swindles.
Major exchanges want their name to be synonymous with some basic protections for their clientele, and these don't make the cut in that respect.

eGremlin
eGremlin

@LuckyDusty

That's a real shame then. The AIM and FTSE 250 still carry the reputation of the Financial Times with them, and getting listed on any of the FTSE indices is usually a proud achievement for a company here.

Fuzzy_Logic
Fuzzy_Logic

@eGremlin
From Wikipedia:

"Because AIM is an unregulated market segment, it escapes most of the mandatory provisions contained in European Union directives – as implemented in the UK – and other rules applicable to companies listed in the LSE"

"AIM-listed companies are often subject to manipulation by institutional investors. AIM-listed companies usually are only required to adhere to the corporate governance requirements of their home jurisdiction, which, as a practical matter, vary widely"

"Although AIM-listed companies are not start-ups, most are small and highly risky. As a consequence, AIM’s investor base is largely composed of institutional investors and wealthy individuals."

Nojokur
Nojokur

@Fuzzy_Logic

Yes the rules are relaxed for the smaller companies listed on AIM. additionally, because their market caps are small, anyone with enough wealth could easily manipulate them.

If it's the same for the OTC markets over there, I certainly wouldn't look past them. Jim Slater's favourite method of investing was small, dynamic growth shares with a lot of potential.

Need_TLC
Need_TLC

Hey guys, whats the best programming language for financial programming.

I'm not only talking about high frequency trading, also long term algoritms and automatic trading.

I'm probably sticking with python since I'm comfortable with it, only thing I'm worried about is the amount of processing power it would take to run algos, get ticker infos, gui's and more.

In my experience it takes a lot of processing power when using certain libraries.

Nude_Bikergirl
Nude_Bikergirl

@Need_TLC

C++.

I've applied to top financial software firms before with no luck.

Garbage Can Lid
Garbage Can Lid

@Nojokur
Jim Slater's favourite method of investing was small, dynamic growth shares with a lot of potential
And Tim Sykes favorite method was penny stocks, but the fact that he got rich doing it doesn't make it a smart idea.
If you "won't look past them" despite the lack of transparency and massive risk of manipulation they entail, then have at it.
It sounds like either you feel the risks are overstated, believe a story of huge gains, or don't have the capital to acquire a profitable size position in a listed equity. That's how people here end up chasing penny/OTC stocks, btw. They don't have sufficient capital to trade, but they fool themselves into believing that they do, because, after all, they can still buy 1,000 shares, even if they're only .43 apiece. The fact that the shares are priced there for a very good reason is usually lost on them.

Good luck with your investments.

Crazy_Nice
Crazy_Nice

@Garbage Can Lid

Small cap, is generally considered anything with a market cap of under a billion, as far as I know. The small-cap companies I invest in are mainly lenders and homebuilders who have been in business for years, have strong balance sheets, good cash flow, good EPS growth, with an attractive P/E and low PEG.

You clearly sound like someone who doesn't like the increased risk of small-cap companies, and that's fine, but there are still perfectly good companies to invest in there.

SomethingNew
SomethingNew

How's $KGJI looking?

w8t4u
w8t4u

can someone explain whats wrong with Robinhood?

massdebater
massdebater

@w8t4u
its free, it has to have a lot of things wrong with it.

i heard theres also no shares to borrow for short sell. why limit yourself to only one side of the game?

likme
likme

@SomethingNew
you tell me.

it looks like its downtrending, but could just be sideways consolidation. no real indication of a buy or short.

Gigastrength
Gigastrength

@massdebater
its free, it has to have a lot of things wrong with it.
This is retarded

TechHater
TechHater

@SomethingNew

Revenue is down, cash flow doesn't seem too bad, seems to be in a good current asset position, return on expenditure is down.

Their EPS has been shaky in recent years and I don't like to see a fall in EPS when looking at the company's historical re

In short, nothing about this company makes me want to go anywhere near it with my money.

Sir_Gallonhead
Sir_Gallonhead

I bought sole because I figured hey may profit fro the trouble their competitor is having.

cum2soon
cum2soon

@Sir_Gallonhead
I meant to say Apple

SomethingNew
SomethingNew

@Gigastrength
Want to guess why no firms use it as their broker?
Or no traders with significant assets?
Is it really likely they're all just dumb and enjoy paying commissions when they don't have to?

Crazy_Nice
Crazy_Nice

@cum2soon
I wouldn't hold for too long m8, the mobile phone market is now saturated and Apple seems to have lost the innovation factor that made it such a success. The long term trend is downwards IMO. It is also facing a €13 billion tax bill from the EU.

On the upside, like Blackberry, it has a huge cash pile it could use for stock buy backs and acquisition. And it's well placed for 5G roll out in 2020.

Personally, I would research which components are used in Huawei phones and invest in any Western suppliers.

King_Martha
King_Martha

Which companies do you guys think will benefit when UK triggers article 50 and formally exits the EU?

It's difficult to see how any segments of the UK will gain from this. Fewer productive workers willing to work long hours for low pay. Potentially less trading with EU countries and less inward investment from the EU.

I can only see legal firms benefitting from this and they are rarely structured as public companies. Maybe the pound will drop lower and multinationals will do well.

Thoughts?

WebTool
WebTool

@iluvmen
-> . <-

RumChicken
RumChicken

ivnest in CERU

kizzmybutt
kizzmybutt

@King_Martha

GlaxoSmithKline has already benefitted to the tune of about a billion. Weak currency means cheap costs for them here, and since their products are manufactured in the UK with high skill, it helps to offset the rising materials costs.

Homebuilding companies such as Bellway which are/have posted results have chairman statements saying they are unaffected by Brexit. Similarly, domestic money lenders are still fine.

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