Is there anything like a "sacred bible" for newfags who want to learn all...

Evilember
Evilember

Is there anything like a "sacred bible" for newfags who want to learn all things about the inside of cars?

Like, something to help out learning from the most basic stuff to more advance things, from components, to engines, maintenance, etc.

What would you guys recommend to do to someone willing to put the hours into it? The time for me to be able to afford my first car is coming closer and I have suddenly realised that I really want to get to know all the proper shit in depth, and if money allows in the future, even to be able to be quite handy with doing whatever modifications or repairs are possible from my garage (by mods I'm not talking about ricing my car up btw).

All urls found in this thread:
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1e0l0swL_q3fZzVZmpRccNRjpkMjgk5_0?usp=sharing
RavySnake
RavySnake

@Evilember
It's called the service manual for your model of car.

TechHater
TechHater

@Evilember
I downloaded a few gigs worth of books and guides with Bitlord a few months ago. It's a ton of stuff ranging from engine rebuilding manuals to tuning guides.

Dreamworx
Dreamworx

@RavySnake
The factory service manual for my car is pretty good stuff. But it assumes a certain amount of background knowledge for more advanced jobs, since it's just a step by step for what to do and the specs you'd want to know, not a how things work or why things are the way they are.

That being said, it's a good way to find out what to ask the internet about or read threads about on a decent relevant car form.

Spamalot
Spamalot

There's no one book that's a "sacred bible" because there's lots of different cars. There plenty of resources out there for every kind of car, though.
One of my favorites is "How to keep your Volkswagen Alive" by John Muir.
Dude was a nuclear submarine engineer who went native in the 60s, moved to the Baja and started fixing VWs out of an adobe garage.
He wrote a plain english service manual for every model of air cooled VW, including hand illustrated exploded views of the entire car.

hairygrape
hairygrape

@TechHater
I also downloaded a video series called Boxwrench Engine Rebuilding. I havent watched it, but it seems really thorough

Playboyize
Playboyize

By the book of factory assembly instructions for your car, tear it apart, put it back together again

Nojokur
Nojokur

@Dreamworx
Factory manuals are a good place to start, Chilton and Haynes manuals can offer a lot more info but they're still kind of written with professional servicing in mind. Most popular cars have a layman's guide available from some publisher.
The internet can be a good source of info as long as you vet and verify against reliable sources. Any idiot can present himself as a shadetree mechanic.
Speaking of, there actually was a show called Shadetree Mechanic that was co-produced by TNN and PBS. It got the axe when TNN became Spike TV, but it was basically an automotive version of "This Old House"

w8t4u
w8t4u

@Nojokur
I got a whole lot of out just grabbing tools and Haynes manual for my very first shitbox and digging in. I forgot where I learned basic theory of operation stuff, but you could probably do alright just surfing wikipedia for a while to learn how different styles of valve trains work, why a diesel is different from gas, how the distributor manages to make spark plugs fire, and general background knowledge like that.

But what really was interesting to me was reading threads about people doing their own modifications or magazine articles written by seasoned tuners and people telling stories of their racing days etc.

kizzmybutt
kizzmybutt

I really liked the haynes sport compact performance when I first started learning about cars.

It's beginner level knowledge, and from 2003 so most of the brands and computer stuff are outdated, but otherwise it has some good information if you're a car noob.

Firespawn
Firespawn

@Evilember
I'm uploading all of the books and videos that I downloaded. I'll share a link when it's done. It's a hair under 10 gigs of files.

BlogWobbles
BlogWobbles

@Firespawn
Please do

LuckyDusty
LuckyDusty

@w8t4u
IMO the most important thing is learning to think systematically. Start with the most basic items and eliminate them until you find what's not working.
It's like the old jab about tech support "is it plugged in?" It seems like stupid question, but it's a starting point for diagnosing the basics of the system.
Once you get into that mode of thinking it becomes a lot easier to understand more complicated repairs.

TechHater
TechHater

@Firespawn
heh, you just made me remember when it was amazing you could store an entire set of encyclopedias on a single 600MB CD-ROM complete with ***COLOR*** pictures. And downloading something like that over dialup would have been a multi-day hassle doing it file by file and having to re-download the files that came out corrupted and then trying to reassemble it into something that worked, and that was if you had a big enough second or third hard drive to hold it.

lel

Illusionz
Illusionz

@LuckyDusty
Absolutely. I came in to it after growing up writing computer programs, and the debugging mentality you get from that is tremendously helpful for diagnosing any kind of system, automotive, appliances, electronics, even in some way other parts of life that aren't machines of some sort.

It's sad to see so much of schooling turn into just having to remember a certain thing or perform a certain operation to pass a test.

Boy_vs_Girl
Boy_vs_Girl

@TechHater
Lol, I remember the first computer I ever got in the 90s had a 40 GB hard drive, and I had to use AOL disks to access the internet. All of those free hours they sent me really added up.

idontknow
idontknow

@Firespawn

Thank you very much to you kind user (and the rest of you as well of course).

I can't wait to get started, even watching some 5 min videos from youtube a few weeks ago already got me hard on how many things I have to learn.

BlogWobbles
BlogWobbles

@Evilember
One user gave away a pdf of Carrol Smith's: Engineer to Win. Havn't had the chance to open it though

New_Cliche
New_Cliche

Trucks are great vehicles to learn wrenching on. They tend to easy parts access and logical layouts, plus parts are easy to come by.
Grab an old Ranger or S-10 and see if you can breath some life into it.

TechHater
TechHater

@New_Cliche
Or an 87-93 foxbody Mustang Lx. the engine is is very straightforward, and it isnt too expensive to work on.. That's what I've bought as a project myself.

girlDog
girlDog

@Spamalot
Sounds like an autist

Gigastrength
Gigastrength

@girlDog
Probably was a little, but it was a really good book. Anybody who owns an air-cooled VW should have a copy.

Techpill
Techpill

@Evilember
@BlogWobbles
@idontknow

As promised. Let me know if there's any problem.

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1e0l0swL_q3fZzVZmpRccNRjpkMjgk5_0?usp=sharing

idontknow
idontknow

Bump

Inmate
Inmate

@Evilember
craigslist general auto manuals. I got given one from the 70's by my grandfater for christmas. It was good shit.

Do you have a car? Manual for that model year, haynes is recomended. Unless its VW, if you own a VW go for the Bentley manual. Theyre godly.

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