Somebody please explin me this or at least give me the correct answer

idontknow
idontknow

somebody please explin me this or at least give me the correct answer. (complex numbers)

Methshot
Methshot

What the fuck does sous la forme mean

StonedTime
StonedTime

@idontknow

Just type that shit in wolframalpha if you want the correct answer. Looks like there would be a "trick" to solve it easily but can't come up with one, though. If not, then it's just a retarded calculation.

AwesomeTucker
AwesomeTucker

@Methshot
From what I remember of the two short years that I took French in high school it means "in the form"

JunkTop
JunkTop

@idontknow
It has 14 solutions and doesn't state in which branch you need to provide the answer. What a piece of literal shit.

BunnyJinx
BunnyJinx

Convert it into polar form and then just do r^14 and 14*arg. Then convert it back to rectangular form.

StrangeWizard
StrangeWizard

@JunkTop
14 solutions
its to the power of 14 not root 14

Stupidasole
Stupidasole

@StrangeWizard
Shit you're right, I'm a bit drunk...
Anyway OP, just use Yooler, then De Moivre's formula.

Sir_Gallonhead
Sir_Gallonhead

@Stupidasole
yooler
Its actually Oiler

VisualMaster
VisualMaster

@JunkTop
You retard

Fuzzy_Logic
Fuzzy_Logic

@VisualMaster
Get necked

Raving_Cute
Raving_Cute

convert to polar form
apply de moivre's theorem
kys

Evil_kitten
Evil_kitten

@Raving_Cute
apply de moivre's theorem
Nonsense! De Moivre was a crank who believed in "transcendental functions". Sine and cosine do not exist. THEY ARE SPOOKS.

You can clearly work this problem out in [math] \mathbb{Q} (i, \sqrt{3}) [/math] and apply the beautiful and elegant binomial theorem! It would be nonsense to use "real numbers" to solve this problem when you can simply use real mathematics that actually exists in the real world.

SomethingNew
SomethingNew

@Evil_kitten
call me when you get this problem done next year

kizzmybutt
kizzmybutt

@idontknow
(3(-1/2+i√3/2))^14
(3(cos(150°)+i*sin(150°))^14
(3∠150°)^14
3^14∠150°*14
3^14∠300°
3^14(1/2-i√3/2)

QED

Poker_Star
Poker_Star

@idontknow
[math] \frac{3}{2} ( \sqrt{3} i -1 ) = 3 ( \frac{\sqrt{3}}{2} +i (-\frac{1}{2}) ) =3( \cos{\frac{-\pi}{6}} + \sin{\frac{-\pi}{6}} ) = 3 e^{-i \frac{\pi}{6}} \implies (\frac{3}{2} ( \sqrt{3} i -1 ) )^{14} = 3^{14} e^{-i \frac{14\pi}{6}} =3^{14} e^{-i \frac{\pi}{3}} = 3^{14} (\frac{1}{2} - i \frac{\sqrt{3}}{2}) [/math]

TreeEater
TreeEater

@SomethingNew
Oh, I'll call you. I will call you to tell you that I'm proud for actually finding the solutions rigorously.

@Poker_Star
[math] \pi [/math]

I am sorry, but what is this weird symbol I see here. Is this a number? Can you please write it down so I may see its digits?

Carnalpleasure
Carnalpleasure

@TreeEater
π
it's an alternative way to write 3

Snarelure
Snarelure

@Carnalpleasure
Oh, then I must have misjudged you. It is a beautiful symbol for 3 indeed. Very classic. It can be drawn with 3 strokes precisely. Clever.

That said, we are not done examining your "proof".
sin
cos

I am sorry but what are these? Can you please write down the expression that gives the value for these functions? I have never seen these. Are you sure they exist?

RavySnake
RavySnake

I can't LaTeX to work on Veeky Forums today, but here you go.

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