Why does math map to physics?

TalkBomber
TalkBomber

Why does math map to physics?

CouchChiller
CouchChiller

@TalkBomber
because math was created to describe the world (physics)

GoogleCat
GoogleCat

@CouchChiller
Insufficient answer. How does the simple act of counting evolve into a body of knowledge that can accurately predict the motion of an accelerating object?

hairygrape
hairygrape

The whole foundation of math is comprised of intuitions taken from nature, that were impressed upon the brain through millions of years of evolution. It would be incredibly weird if math didn't yield results that apply directly back to nature.

Methnerd
Methnerd

@GoogleCat
What is the alternative exactly? That physical objects behave in radically different ways despite having the same starting conditions?

Flameblow
Flameblow

@GoogleCat
Because these things can inherently be defined as quantity.

DeathDog
DeathDog

@hairygrape
Why would that be weird? It's weird that it does map directly to nature. Intuitively or even philosophically, there is no clear correlation between the two.

Crazy_Nice
Crazy_Nice

math is the fundamental and physics maps on top of it.
As much as physicist might hate to admit it, their discipline is not the fundamental study of reality. There theoretically can be universes with completely different laws of physics but you would still describe those laws mathematically. Math (and epistemology) supersede physics

haveahappyday
haveahappyday

@Crazy_Nice
implying there can't be different universes where different math applies
You can't have your cake and eat it too

Evilember
Evilember

@Flameblow
Not quantity, relationships.

F=ma

This is not a statement of quantity, but it is a statement of relationship. The question though is why do these relationships have anything whatsoever to do with the real world.

Flameblow
Flameblow

@Crazy_Nice
t. mathtard who doesn't have a clue about the origin or basis of his own field of study

WebTool
WebTool

@Evilember
It's a statement of proportion and magnitude, you stupid ass, both of which are more fundamental than math, and form part of the basis of math.

RumChicken
RumChicken

@TalkBomber
mathematics is a language, although a highly formalized one; to the point that the ambiguity that is essential to other natural languages has been almost completely eradicated.
It's meant to write things that 2500 years ago took several lines of letters in one very condensed sentence. The fact that you can translate any mathematical text to plain english is proof of what I say.

So basically if we can understand it, we can express it with math; furthermore, math as a language liberates us from excess word "luggage" and allows us to reach higher knowledge that would be possible in natlangs.

StonedTime
StonedTime

@WebTool
It's a relationship between force, mass and acceleration. Also still doesn't answer my question. Math aside, why should anything map to physics, much less map to it nearly perfectly?

VisualMaster
VisualMaster

@RumChicken
You've managed to write a lot of words about nothing

eGremlin
eGremlin

@VisualMaster
not my fault you didn't understand a thing.
I think it's clear as day.

JunkTop
JunkTop

@StonedTime

Mathematics and physics are branches of logic, logic stems from consciousness. Consciousness experiences the physical, and uses its tool of logic to help make sense of it.

PurpleCharger
PurpleCharger

best projection hands down, and it's made with a simple equation regarding pi
mapping is literally math

BunnyJinx
BunnyJinx

@eGremlin
My point is you didn't answer the question or even try to address it. The fact that you can translate between math and English at the cost of clarity tells us exactly nothing about why math describes physics or why the notion of quantity leads to extrapolation of natural laws.

Illusionz
Illusionz

Einstein thought the elegant equations of the universe exist because God wrote it.

Supergrass
Supergrass

@BunnyJinx
on the contrary it says everything.
You use a language to describe nature. That language can be english, or math.
Therefore the answer to your question is: because math is a language; and is the language that was used to write physics with.
Also if you wonder why are there mathematical theorems that do not represent anything in physics, it's because in a language there can be well constructed sentences that don't have real world counterpart (fantasy books and such). On the other hand, a valid mathematical "sentence" that had no real world representation initially could find one. Just think of The Illiad: considered fantasy and legend for centuries until Troy was unearthed.

So what I'm saying is that math is not something that "pre-exists" and then is mapped to the real world. It's a highly specialized language precisely designed to describe nature and quantify it, then it has evolved and became richer, but essentially is the same thing in the context of your question.

Need_TLC
Need_TLC

@Supergrass
Therefore the answer to your question is: because math is a language; and is the language that was used to write physics with.
Except physics exists independently of language. The fact that you can map one onto another is a happy accident at best. Your entire argument is flawed.

Garbage Can Lid
Garbage Can Lid

@TalkBomber
SET THEORY IS THE THEORY OF EVERYTHING INCLUDING ABSTRACT OBJECTS AND PHYSICS IS A SUBSET OF MATH.

Harmless_Venom
Harmless_Venom

@Garbage Can Lid
PHYSICS IS A SUBSET OF MATH
Impossible because even with our best math, our results are essentially still just very, very good approximations. Just like you can't accurately measure a piece of wood because no matter the degree of your accuracy, you can always increase accuracy and never get to an exact answer. The uncomfortable truth is that exact answers don't exist.

PackManBrainlure
PackManBrainlure

@Illusionz

kek, what a brainlet

Sharpcharm
Sharpcharm

@Need_TLC

implying the language we have now isn't a consequence of physics/chemistry

Emberburn
Emberburn

@Harmless_Venom

the absent of evidence doesn't mean the evidence is absent

t. George W. Bush

AwesomeTucker
AwesomeTucker

@Harmless_Venom
(you)

BlogWobbles
BlogWobbles

@GoogleCat
because nature is really nice. would be a retarded world if we couldn't describe it with something useful and it would have to make zero sense (literally, math is just logic) for us not to be able to map it with math

Raving_Cute
Raving_Cute

@Evilember
F=ma
not F=dp/dt
brainlet detected

iluvmen
iluvmen

@StonedTime
why should anything map to physics, much less map to it nearly perfectly?
Let's try tackling this problem with a much simpler version of a world with physical phenomena than our own and work our way up from there.
Suppose there's a world that's mostly empty, except for a single rock that's floating around in the void. No suppose this rock isn't stable and a few seconds after this world begins it breaks apart into a bunch of smaller rocks.
Now which would be stranger?:
A) The smaller rocks behave similarly to each other because they all came from the same larger rock.
B) The smaller rocks inexplicably behave in radically different ways to each other despite having all come from the same larger rock.
If you answered B, then good, proceed to apply this logic to every other phenomena that emerged in our own universe and you'll get the same general idea, that physical things exhibit extreme similarity and predictability in behavior because everything in our universe to some degree or another shares in one unified origin.
So objects in the physical world are similar and predictable, but does this answer why mathematics work to make these predictions?
What's the first mathematical idea?
It's repetition. Instead of just seeing a bunch of trees in a direct way as sensory stimuli that you mindlessly react to, it's possible to begin noticing the *idea* of trees. As in, these different trees are all similar enough to be categorized as instances of the same abstract class of "tree." And by abstracting out the idea of "tree" from the particulars of specific trees, we can begin to detect repetition (possible now because even though each tree is not the same as all other trees, they're close enough to where we can behave as though they were all the same). And by detecting repetition, the first number is born. Instead of just trees, we now have "two" trees. And now we can take that number and abstract it out to say something not just about trees but about two of anything.

JunkTop
JunkTop

@Need_TLC
it's not. Physics is the tower of HUMAN knowledge to describe reality as we perceive it.
Reality would exist without us, but physics wouldn't.

Anyway if you didn't get it by now I think it's useless to keep trying to convince you... It takes a bit of insight to realize this I guess.

CodeBuns
CodeBuns

@PackManBrainlure
einstein was a hack

Illusionz
Illusionz

@JunkTop
This is the correct answer. We shouldn't forget that physics is not about what reality is but rather about what we perceive as reality. This perception requires interpretation, and the way we achieve this is inherently linked to the way we do math.

BlogWobbles
BlogWobbles

@TalkBomber
you might as well ask why English maps to physics

farquit
farquit

Why does math map to physics?

it does not you idiot. physics maps onto math because literally everything we can describe systematically maps onto math.

5mileys
5mileys

@haveahappyday
Eh, you really couldnt. please explain such a universe.

askme
askme

@RumChicken
to the point that the ambiguity that is essential to other natural languages has been almost completely eradicated.

PackManBrainlure
PackManBrainlure

because it's physicists who create math (e.g. Calculus)

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