What would happen if I used milk or buttermilk instead of water for pizza dough?

Techpill
Techpill

What would happen if I used milk or buttermilk instead of water for pizza dough?

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PackManBrainlure
PackManBrainlure

E N R I C H E D

Carnalpleasure
Carnalpleasure

The crust would get fluffier and oilier.

GoogleCat
GoogleCat

next you could replace oil with honey

Soft_member
Soft_member

and flour with quinoa

TalkBomber
TalkBomber

and dont forget to add pineapple and bananas on top

JunkTop
JunkTop

and mozzarella with soy mozzarella

New_Cliche
New_Cliche

And tomatoes with plum butter

Stupidasole
Stupidasole

Can one of you fucking cunts just give me a straight answer?

Spazyfool
Spazyfool

plum butter

Fried_Sushi
Fried_Sushi

Try it and see what happens. Cooking is about being experimental.

Need_TLC
Need_TLC

It would be extremely gainful

Raving_Cute
Raving_Cute

expecting a straight answer
Reddit is that way my friend.

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Lunatick
Lunatick

Make two doughs
One that you're going to ruin with buttermilk
One that you're gonna make with water

Sir_Gallonhead
Sir_Gallonhead

Underage /b/ poster detected

TreeEater
TreeEater

Not since 2013 desu. Now its all about /sp/, /fit/, /gif/, and [spoiler]/gsg/[/spoiler]

Sharpcharm
Sharpcharm

I like replacing 1/3 of the water wit whole milk to make breads richer. Cooks about the same. Your mileage may vary.

iluvmen
iluvmen

Every time I see this image I get mad

Emberfire
Emberfire

this.
i personally prefer having at least some milk in the dough

Illusionz
Illusionz

I find it makes my pizza dough easier to work with if I'm doing an overnight cold rise as well. I usually swap out 1/2 a cup of water for milk in the recipe and that's enough for working in my kitchen anyway.

CouchChiller
CouchChiller

The fat in the milk will inhibit gluten development in the dough. To some extent this may be a good thing, as the baked crust will be more tender. It may however prevent you from getting the dough very thin without it breaking. You'll have to adjust the amount you're kneading. The fat and the milk solids will also enhance browning during baking.

Buttermilk will have quite different effects. It generally has less fat than milk, so it would not inhibit gluten development to the same degree. If it's cultured buttermilk, it will be acidic which will cause fermentation to be slower. The lactic acid culture might also start fermenting the dough, giving it a sourdough-like flavor. Also the acidified dough will not brown as well in the oven, as low pH will inhibit the Maillard reaction.

Stark_Naked
Stark_Naked

Thanks for the response lad, appreciate it.

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