Why is it that at my university...

Why is it that at my university, the Asian transfer students are FAR more literate and capable of writing GOOD essays and paper than native English speakers? There are exceptions of course, but generally the asians > everyone else at WRITTEN english.
Pic related, my campus

Other urls found in this thread:

blogs.wsj.com/chinarealtime/2015/05/29/u-s-schools-expelled-8000-chinese-students-for-poor-grades-cheating/
reuters.com/investigates/special-report/college-cheating-iowa/
businessinsider.com/college-counselors-worried-chinese-students-are-cheating-into-american-schools-2015-7

If you honestly think that 99% of Asian transfer students aren't simply paying a decent Engliah major to write all their papers for them, then I've got some magic beans to sell you.

>Why is it that at my university, the [race] transfer students are FAR more [compelling but debatable quality] than native English speakers? There are exceptions of course, but generally [race] > everyone else at [activity].

GO FORTH AND TROLL, YE DENIZENS OF CHAOS

Let me ask you this: Have you ever once walked across the quad at UIUC without witnessing a female asian student using her phone to take a picture of a squirrel? Because I have not. You could walk across the quad in the middle of a fucking tornado, and there would be at least one Korean or Chinese girl taking a picture of a squirrel.

Yeah, I started noticing that more and more lately. But what I´m trying to figure out is why this certain group of people, who learned English as a second or third language, are seamlessly able to outperform English students in English. I feel there should be strict writing prerequisite for this university. If there was one, I think that there would be far less idiotic people that slipped through admissions.
I´m just rambling at this point...

>Asian
>transfer students

Either because their wealthy parents could afford to send them to good English tutors, or they're paying for essays to be written

Third possibility: they're competing against American students.

The north quad asians absolutely cannot write papers better than the native students. A lot of them can barely form a coherent sentence in English.

I go to a stem school and the anons accusing them of cheating are at least correct for my experience here.
The only asians with the opportunity to go to uni in the us are filthy rich. I know many of them and they throw away their parents' money without thought. They show up spoiled and cheat their way through every class they take. They're also notoriously bad at integrating with the rest of the school, hanging out only with fellow asian international students. I've made friends with brazilians, belgians, spaniards, brits, saudis, canadians, russians, indians, south africans, and italians while here, but asians have a strange elitism that makes them disdain even asian-americans that are fluent in their language.
Asian-americans are the ones that fit the stereotype of actually being hardworking because their immigrant families are the exact opposite.

That's mostly the Chinese.

Koreans tend to be a bit more outgoing as far as the big three Asian exchange nations go. Girls like being out of the ever-prying eyes of their parents and friends, and Korean guys have some panty-destroying aura or something due to K-Pop, for some weird reason.

Japanese students are a little less outgoing than Koreans, partly due to cultural shyness, and embarrassment over not being terribly fluent in other languages (those that can speak tend to integrate pretty well). As an example, Japan ranks 2nd (only beaten out by North Korea) as the nation with the worst ESL skills.

The Chinese, on the other hand, are in a troubling situation. Mineral and oil wealth hae suddenly launched thousands of families in China from the working poor into the upper middle class. The parents of kids born into such families dote on them hand and foot, and insist on giving them every possible leg-up in life.

Commonly, parents in China are told that if they want their kid to kick ass in life, they need to get a degree from the US. This is the gold standard, as far as they are concerned. Sadly, when the student doesn't have the English speaking skills necessary to succeed in a foreign university, parents with plenty of money, and the best of intentions will often resort to business that will falsely certify their kid as passing TOEFL scores, and forging letters of recommendation to get them accepted into foreign universities. In the US, this is a huge problem, because many schools are granting admissions to Chinese exchange students that are not prepared to succeed at their programs, in favor of local or out-of-state students, partly because the Chinese exchange students are expected to fork over nearly double what out-of-state tuition would cost.

So they get to the program with piss-poor English, have great difficulty following lectures, assignments, and tests, and tend to resort to using their expendable resource (family's newfound wealth) to try and skate by. Failure means letting down your parents that have tried so hard to provide for you, and you go back home without THE degree (China, loves the prestige of a respected school in the job market).

Also, since they can't speak English to save their lives, or at least their academic records, they feel alienated from the rest of the student body. While I DO think they could make much greater efforts in integrating with other students, they are in a difficult spot if they don't have the necessary language skills to do coursework, make friends, ask for help from professors/tutors/resource centers, or do day-to-day things requiring foreign language skills.

>blogs.wsj.com/chinarealtime/2015/05/29/u-s-schools-expelled-8000-chinese-students-for-poor-grades-cheating/

>reuters.com/investigates/special-report/college-cheating-iowa/

>businessinsider.com/college-counselors-worried-chinese-students-are-cheating-into-american-schools-2015-7

That's not a good explanation. Americans are the most intellectually successful people on the planet

>ranked by the Chinese
I don't expect an American to see the problems with the methodology, or the result where 2nd place for #highly ranked universities is China.

Great explanation. Did you do research on this? Or did you have the knowledge beforehand?

at my uni the Chinese students are dumb as fucking rocks and all cheat

ESL Asians have some of the worst English writing I've ever read.
Academia has nothing to do with intelligence.

Another thing to add is that Chinese students coming to the U.S. only do so because they didn't score high enough on their college examinations to get into BeiDa or TsingHua, whereby their degrees would be as useless as one bought online (which there are services for). Their journeys abroad are basically meant to forestall the inevitable: that they will one day go back to China and work a shit job so that they can buy a shit apartment so that they can finally marry and have kids. Not a very pleasant situation overall. I've met several Chinese exchange students at my college, and they seem very depressed about their outlooks on life, and I'm sure many do suffer from significant mental stress. On top of that, they are not prepared for the climate, "party life", class participation and, most of all, somewhat humorously, the food. I've taken Chinese friends out to eat at Chinese restaurants and seen their faces light up as they enthusiastically stuff down food which to them is probably the only reminder they have of their lives back home. Chinese people seem to really dislike Western food. Those are my two cents. In all, I think it's the Universities' faults for allowing these kids in, but alas my hatred for my own college's governing board deserves its own discussion.

>Americans are the most intellectually successful people on the planet

This graph is irrelevant to your claim you fucking imbecile

>Japan ranks 2nd (only beaten out by North Korea) as the nation with the worst ESL skills.
This is very strange to me.

it's mostly drivel. Lots of generalizations and basically rehashing preconceived (and erroneous) notions. but it sits well with the standard narrative of westerners observing east asia so people eat it up.

Why is it strange, Japanese people can't speak English for shit

It just isn't linguistically compatible for them and Japan is very monocultural

i've studied at 3 of the schools on that list, and no, american universities blow hard since even a loser like me devoid of any intellectual creativity was able to get in and excel. i had more in-depth discussion and quality instruction in a single one of my public high school's ap classes than i did with all my professors at these elite schools. i feel as though after the age of 18 my mind was put into a decompression chamber and all i am left with now is a seven figure salary and a pitiable interest in reading anything past the daily headlines.

I would hardly call it "research," but a few months back I spend a few days looking up some completely unscientific explanations and reports about the subjects. The bit about Korean and Japanese is admittedly from my own untrained observations of exchange students when in university.

It is a pretty big concern for both the US (and Canada) and China, in particular. Students are cheating their away abroad, making it harder for local students in the foreign nations to be accepted, because the universities have incentive to gouge the exchange students for tons of money. Then, for those rare few that somehow manage to cheat or bullshit their way through, they get sent back with a degree that might help land them a job, but none of the skills necessary to safely or correctly perform their duties in said job. Imagine employing engineers that have no idea how to safely design something, or giving grant money to scientists that fudge their numbers, abuse statistical methods to make their results look promising, and don't bother to go through peer-review before publishing.

No one comes out ahead in these situations except, perhaps, the universities that make money hand-over-fist by running desperate exchange students through their revolving door programs.

Their government doesn't really make the schools do much in the way of English teaching, despite the boasting of "they learn it from 6th grade to 12th grade!" You tend to have a Japanese instructor that learned it as a second language teaching it, a native-speaker teacher's assistant to act as a parrot to let them know how words should sound, and very stiff, boring grammar with very clinical and dull lesson plans and language drills. It's pretty much set up just to get students to pass national tests on it, and in a country as culturally homogeneous as Japan, they don't have much change to actively practice what they learn.

When you don't practice a second language, you tend not to retain it very well. If you mostly studied the language in high school? You'll be lucky if you remember more than how to say "My name is user."

Japan has a strong bully culture. If you excel at English language class in primary school, you get bullied.

...

well, it's not so much bully as it is shame... i knew some fluent guys who wouldn't speak it in front of their friends because then they'd appear as if they were "showing off"

does role playing on a Sri Lanka synchronized dancing image board bring you satisfaction? sexual fulfillment?

Asians are simply a superior race, my friend. They created all that anime, after all.

Except that's utter horse shit. Asian grad students are definitely more intelligent than their western counterparts. This is because people getting graduate degrees typically are actually doing it for their careers and not just to impress socialites by getting a 4 year degree from a fancy American college on daddy's dime. That and most American grad students I knew were just trying to escape the real world for a few more years.

Chinese undergrads in particular are some of the dumbest pieces of shit on any given university campus though. I know this from having to work with them, and later from grading their papers. A bunch of liars and cheaters with disgusting habits. I have no prejudice against Asian Americans, or Japanese, or Koreans, but holy shit Chinese foreign students are horrible. Only ones that are worse are Arab undergrads.

I once led a group of prospective Japanese students on a tour of our campus and I swear they took a picture of every squirrel they saw. I told them that squirrels are just rats with fluffy tails. They also love to take pictures of any flower they see. I don't know wtf it is with Asians and taking pictures, they just can't stop themselves.

>If you mostly studied the language in high school? You'll be lucky if you remember more than how to say "My name is user."
Yo puedo hablar un poco espanol.

Maybe it's because they learn formal English rather than slang? Most native speakers I know speak in some sort of slang.

>grad
We all know he means fucking undergrads.

>It is a pretty big concern for both the US (and Canada) and China, in particular. Students are cheating their away abroad, making it harder for local students in the foreign nations to be accepted, because the universities have incentive to gouge the exchange students for tons of money. Then, for those rare few that somehow manage to cheat or bullshit their way through, they get sent back with a degree that might help land them a job, but none of the skills necessary to safely or correctly perform their duties in said job. Imagine employing engineers that have no idea how to safely design something, or giving grant money to scientists that fudge their numbers, abuse statistical methods to make their results look promising, and don't bother to go through peer-review before publishing.
>No one comes out ahead in these situations except, perhaps, the universities that make money hand-over-fist by running desperate exchange students through their revolving door programs.

I thought they just needed a degree so their dads could get them, basically, comfortable sinecures.

I'd love to attend Yale, I may have to go.

What are the best universities for Campus beauty and atmosphere?

I tutored a few Asian students. Never had any Chinese though I heard horror stories from those who did. Lazy and shameless cheaters by all accounts. I taught a few Koreans and a Vietnamese girl, all very hardworking and serious. Not the best at English, but compared to my white or latino charges I could push them to do better, they took their sessions seriously. If I put pressure on a white kid he'd probably just stop coming or change tutors.

Get the fuck off of this board if that's all you care about.

I went to a high school in Southern California for the IB program where 75%+ of my peers were Korean. I then ended up going to a school that is also populated by an incredible number of Asians (UC Berkeley, "Cal") and I've come to really resent Asian students for their views on education after spending ~6 years surrounded by them.

Basically, I feel that Asians (Koreans especially, because I've had less exposure to Chinese students in the US) are anti-intellectual in their pursuit of higher learning; they're so incredibly fixated on what will make them "successful" that they remove any shred of intelligence that exists within their "sphere". To find an Asian who doesn't exist in this sphere is an anomaly, and they're usually Asian kids who don't hang out with other Asians.

This is pretty poorly written, but if anyone has any questions about it, I'd be happy to actually give a well-composed reply.

>The places which produce the most books per year don't know shit
>The most powerful economies in the entire world are stupid when it comes to academia.
>Lel fat people live in America so they are dumb and also chineses are robots le lel.
>People only go to those schools from across the entire fucking world because they are popular le haha le haha haha
>My country is better but I'm not gonna tell you which one!

Inb4 one sentence reply with some variation of "ur from America I can tell"

>Get the fuck off of this board if that's all you care about.
Nah, I'd appreciate an answer though.

Are you kidding me? The biggest obstacle for chinese students coming to university is the English requirement. My school built a whole new prep college to coach them through the test: $50 000 dollars for an 11 month program. I sometimes think that UBC exists to squeeze as much money out of China as possible and use it to build more tacky buildings. A hundred years from now there will this huge ziggurat of glass, concrete, and totem poles where Point Gray used to be and every fuerdai will be hocking their rolex.

>The places which produce the most books per year don't know shit

How is this relevant to anything? I admit that the Americans have or at least had a strong intellectual class, but half of the books published in China are English or math textbooks. There's a billion Chinese people and they churn out a lot of handbooks for students. It's not some intellectual powerhouse, it's just a big country. The UK publishes the most per capita, no surprise really.

>The UK publishes the most per capita

no, that would be iceland my dear plebbo friend

japanese tend to be able to read and write english far better than they can speak it or understand it when listening to it
they're very aware of the jap tendency to mix up r and l for example.

Half the students at my university are chinks and they're all cheating, monolingual retards.

I experience the opposite with the Chinese at my uni. They have this weird way of constructing sentences. With good intention I can sort of understand the point they are going for, but the sentences seem to be constructed out of poorly thrown together nouns and some verbs without a well constructed framework of the other word types (non-english native here, i don't know their names).

I think it has to do with the way the Chinese language works with using signs. I think sentences leave more open to interpretation in Chinese? Context makes the meaning clear, and so they don't have the same feeling for carefully constructing sentences using these other word types.

From my own subjective experience this sounds more like typically Korean, than typically Asian. Koreans are obsessed with the shallow exterior in all things they do.

...

>I think it has to do with the way the Chinese language works with using signs. I think sentences leave more open to interpretation in Chinese? Context makes the meaning clear, and so they don't have the same feeling for carefully constructing sentences using these other word types.

Chinese is also quite flexible when it comes to making sentences that are grammatically correct, compared to English.