What direction does the Sun move in its orbit around the Galaxy?

massdebater
massdebater

What direction does the Sun move in its orbit around the Galaxy?

It's a simple question, but I'm having some great difficulty finding a proven answer.

I had thought the Suns orbit was perpendicular to the planetary orbits. That is to say that the Sun travels "South or North" through the galaxy. Yet the best "official" answer I can find (archive.is/QmcmO) states that the Sun orbits the Galaxy on the same plane as Earths orbit. They go so far as to state that the Suns orbit directly crosses the circle of Earths orbit at the point of the Autumn Equinox.

So what is it Veeky Forums? Are we moving South? That's my best guess, but I want evidence proving this on way or the other.

Attached: spiral-solar-system-2-for-web1.jpg (52 KB, 532x343)

All urls found in this thread:

archive.is/QmcmO)
solar-center.stanford.edu/FAQ/Qsolsysspeed.html
imgsrc.hubblesite.org/hvi/uploads/image_file/image_attachment/23863/full_jpg.jpg

Deadlyinx
Deadlyinx

I'm not sure on the answer, but I can tell you that the pic in OP is wrong.

PackManBrainlure
PackManBrainlure

The motion of the Sun through the Galaxy is neither normal to the plane of the ecliptic nor at right angles to that plane.

solar-center.stanford.edu/FAQ/Qsolsysspeed.html

We're moving in a roughly circular orbit (i.e. our distance from the center of the galaxy doesn't change a lot) but we bob in and out of the plane -- like the edge of a vinyl LP which was left out in the hot sun.

Nearby stars, which approximately share our motion (low relative velocities) have their spin axes oriented randomly. There is no link between galactic-motion and the orbits of their planets (if they have any.)

Incidentally, your illustration looks like one I've seen on web-pages positing that the Sun "tows" the planets in its wake, like the Mach cone of a supersonic jet. If that's where you found it, disregard anything you read there. It's crackpottery.

Attached: Capture.jpg (49 KB, 638x236)

King_Martha
King_Martha

crossing the galactic plane

Would this the zero point energy in the region around the solar system?
Did we cross the galactic plane on Dec 21, 2012, the Mayan calendar end day?

Evil_kitten
Evil_kitten

*Would this change

Poker_Star
Poker_Star

No and no

zero point energy is the energy left over in empty space when you take all other kinds of energy away, so it's the same everywhere

RavySnake
RavySnake

This, what can change is entering and leaving gas clouds, which dampen ambient radiation, I think.

AwesomeTucker
AwesomeTucker

gas clouds in a vacuum

/x/

Harmless_Venom
Harmless_Venom

Attached: gas-in-vaccum.png (1.57 MB, 1245x650)

viagrandad
viagrandad

artist's rendition

Inmate
Inmate

imgsrc.hubblesite.org/hvi/uploads/image_file/image_attachment/23863/full_jpg.jpg

photograph

Attached: full-jpg.jpg (3.08 MB, 3964x4224)

Emberfire
Emberfire

lel Nigger, go look up the map of the Local Bubble.

Need_TLC
Need_TLC

Not a photo cretins open your eyes, off this board now fantasists. /x/

idontknow
idontknow

The Stanford link (in the post you're asking about) says we crossed the galactic plane about two million years ago.
The Mayans were a trifle off.

Incidentally, the "center of the galactic plane" is only an abstraction. Just means there's as many stars "above" as "below". Nothing happens there. There's no signpost. The location and time can only be computed to some degree of approximation.

It's a unreal as "the edge of the Galaxy". If you ever saw the first episode (not counting the pilot) of the Original Star Trek, the Enterprise crosses an "energy barrier" at the rim. There's no such barrier and no rim. The stars just become increasingly far apart. It's gradual.

StonedTime
StonedTime

literally pieced together using data, it's a guess at what it looks like

viagrandad
viagrandad

and this should be impossible because?

askme
askme

yes, pieced together from data describing the photons that hit the detector from that direction, pieced together in a visible form, commonly called an "image"

askme
askme

Gases equilibrate in a vacuum, impossible to remain in any shape.

Poker_Star
Poker_Star

Stars are made of what?

Methnerd
Methnerd

Plasma

WebTool
WebTool

and who says that they're not equilibriating? you do realize that the structures are light years big, right?

ZeroReborn
ZeroReborn

They'd never end up as a "cloud" in the first place, impossible.

CodeBuns
CodeBuns

arguing semantics
holy shit, kill yourself

there are plenty of interstellar clouds, and tons of pictures of them
and they do not emit any visible light, but the electromagnetic spectrum is much bigger than just visible light, maybe you should do some fucking research you imbecile

Sir_Gallonhead
Sir_Gallonhead

All I need to know is that gas clouds cannot exist in a vacuum. And if they did actually exist, they would also emit visible light.

likme
likme

you're very wrong on both your shit points
our sun and every single star formed from collapsing gas clouds due to gravity
gravity is also what keeps gas clouds together in a vacuum

Evilember
Evilember

our sun and every single star formed from collapsing gas clouds due to gravity

Wonderful imagination you have there. So you're telling me that gas clouds "collapse" in a vacuum? That means absolutely nothing.

Gravity keeps gas clouds together in a vacuum? Earth's gravity can't even stop a helium balloon from floating away, what and earth do you think gravity can do in a vacuum?

RavySnake
RavySnake

Earth's gravity can't even stop a helium balloon from floating away
holy shit, you are an imbecile
helium balloons float up because they are less dense than our fucking atmosphere you moron
kill yourself this instant, please

CouchChiller
CouchChiller

do the planets orbit in aproximately the same plane as the sun orbits through the galaxy
yes. disks are stable structures that allow for harmonics and minimizes collisions.

If you had some huge fucking commet rip through Saturn's rings causing major disruption, the rings would reform roughly in about 2 (earth) years.

VisualMaster
VisualMaster

Kek. And what happens to a helium balloon in a vacuum?

Ignoramus
Ignoramus

you should really use a tripcode, or a name
you're a fucking moron that can't even grasp the basics of physics, i'd rather talk with a worm

Supergrass
Supergrass

There's no such barrier and no rim. The stars just become increasingly far apart. It's gradual.
There is are terminal shock layers in the heliopsphere where plasma densities of the solar and intragalactic winds vary by orders of magnitude. The Milky Way is a solitary galaxy so our terminus is less interesting compared to more active galactic clusters. But the situation is more interesting than you suggest.

Especially if you're considering the parts on the edge of the galactic disk where dark matter densities are much higher than matter densities.

Attached: heliosphere.jpg (23 KB, 474x319)

Raving_Cute
Raving_Cute

plasma
Which would be an ionized gas. You neglect gravity

happy_sad
happy_sad

Current physics is retarded so no wonder you think you grasp it. I bet you wear t-shirts like pic related.

Attached: image-cometothenerdside-black2-49.png-resize-600x600-0a83270b-485f-459e-8579-5c7d24ffa4ba-590x[1].pn (185 KB, 590x590)

w8t4u
w8t4u

Plasma is high energy and ionized gas, dumbass.

Inmate
Inmate

No brainlet, its electromagnetic.

Poker_Star
Poker_Star

They literally do emit visible light, especially the high energy clouds that also emitt x-rays. The majority of "star forming" nebulae have to be cool enough to collapse and have lower temperature emissions except where they are adjacent to newly formed stars where they're lit the fuck up and both reflect and absorb visible light.

Methshot
Methshot

yes, true, i was wrong there

Evil_kitten
Evil_kitten

gif is from this guys website

The Sun travels South basically, offset at an angle of 30 degrees to the Solar plane, of which Earth's axis is tilted back towards center 23 degrees. So The Sun moving about 6 degrees away from due South in its galactic orbit. This may change as the Sun "bobs" high and low, in and out, relative to the Galactic core.

Attached: solar-system-motion.gif (3.56 MB, 512x288)

kizzmybutt
kizzmybutt

Kek, the stars would make far different movements if that bullshit was real.

RumChicken
RumChicken

You do realise that the revolution around the galaxy is orders of magnitude slower than the revolution of the planets around the sun, right?
Most likely not.

Ignoramus
Ignoramus

Individual stars expel wind. The galaxy doesn't. You can't point to a radius and say "this is the edge". The stars go from being a few lightyears apart to being tens and then hundreds of lightyears apart.

If you take a picture of a galaxy "face on", you see a swirly disk. If you take a longer exposure, the core "burns out" of the image but more stars show at the edge. There is no sharply defined edge, nothing equivalent to a heliopause.
If it happened, there'd be a bright band of radio emissions encircling that galaxy. There's not. You just don't realize the scale of what you're seeing.

"at the edge where dark matter densities much higher than matter densities" is nonsense. DM doesn't interact with baryonic matter except gravitationally. There may be a lot of dark matter in toto but it doesn't seem to clump to form obstacles to the flow of intergalactic gas (such as there is.)

If you disagree, please cite articles. Anything that says "electric universe" doesn't count. This board is supposed to be Veeky Forums, not /x/.

Supergrass
Supergrass

Yes brainlet I'm aware of that weak excuse. The stars would still measurably change. Not to mention that other stars/galaxies are supposed to be moving too? What a clusterfuck.

JunkTop
JunkTop

see it's the precession of the equinox

The precession of the equinoxes refers to the observable phenomena of the rotation of the heavens, a cycle which spans a period of (approximately) 25,920 years, over which time the constellations appear to slowly rotate around the earth, taking turns at rising behind the rising sun on the vernal equinox.

Snarelure
Snarelure

The stars rotate around us, it's not the fucking earth spinning that's incredibly retarded.

Inmate
Inmate

The stars would still measurably change.
They do measurably change, over long periods of time.

Oh you're a troll.

Harmless_Venom
Harmless_Venom

literally pieced together using data
That is literally what a camera is. Your brain also literally pieces together data collected by your two eyeballs, does that mean everything you see with both eyes open is fake because it is a combination of two separate images?

w8t4u
w8t4u

so not only does the sun orbit the galactic plane in a 60 degree tilt, it also orbits far off center ?
wut the fuck we are freaks
is the galatic plane way overstated ?
how the hell are we in an orbiting arm if that bullshit pic is correct ?

hairygrape
hairygrape

dont believe this>

pic related

Attached: sun-orbiting-milky-way.png (156 KB, 1907x452)

Poker_Star
Poker_Star

Everything around us is doing the same.

SniperGod
SniperGod

230 million years is a lot slower

RavySnake
RavySnake

photoshopped combo colors added probably 1,000 pics or more and plenty of added ideation from "theoretical data"

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LuckyDusty
LuckyDusty

yeah it's a bullshit site

CouchChiller
CouchChiller

look at the truth idiot

eGremlin
eGremlin

The planets mostly appear with the Milky Way in the background. So the ecliptic -- the plane of the planets' orbits -- is roughly in the same plane as the disk of the galaxy.

Boy_vs_Girl
Boy_vs_Girl

The background of your pic is of a planet, the foreground is of the eagle nebula. The nebula is far larger than the planet, which is why its images appears sharp and bright while the planet appears dim and pixelated.

The nebula is colored to reveal data gathered by instruments that can see frequencies of light outside the visible spectrum. This is so humans can see and understand the structure of the nebula instead of just the bright stars around the nebula like we would see with the naked eye. This is not theoretical data, but hard data, just like any other image of light outside of the visible spectrum that is falsely colored.

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5mileys
5mileys

best solar system model

Fuzzy_Logic
Fuzzy_Logic

What direction does the Sun move in its orbit around the Galaxy?
The solar apex is roughly towards the constellation Hercules. The general direction is most easily found with the naked eye by looking for the bright star Vega, going a bit south. For us in the northern hemisphere, Vega rises in the NE around 10PM this month.

Dreamworx
Dreamworx

There is no relationship between the ecliptic and the galactic plane. Pic related. Just after sunset, the Milky Way is the blue band, the ecliptic is the red band. They more nearly perpendicular.

Attached: Sky.png (20 KB, 635x477)

Evilember
Evilember

In a vacuum chamber on Earth a helium balloon sits on the floor, because there are no denser gases to push it up.

In space it will be attracted to the strongest gravitational well it is affected by.

CodeBuns
CodeBuns

lmao you are an idiot
it's composited photoshop from crap
just like the bigger portion of my pic shows

Supergrass
Supergrass

you can literally see the direction senpai , just go outside at night

Evil_kitten
Evil_kitten

THE SUN thus us, stays within the general plane of the milky way
it's fun for fuckheads to fuck with everyone's dull minds though...

100,000 light years across - the milky way
sun/earth just up or down 60-250 light years off the milky plane

100,000 across vs 155 average up or down

this is a disc where the sun/earth is so in line with it you could even feel or see the bump with the naked finger or eye to scale

jeezus christ, for all practical purposes it's a perfect rotation in exact alignment with the galactic plane

happy_sad
happy_sad

Attached: HUBBLE-ASSHOLES-SHOW-OFF.png (1.13 MB, 1920x1200)

kizzmybutt
kizzmybutt

gonna look from the "top" or the "bottom" of the milky way galactic disc ?
"topside" were rotating clockwise
bottom counter
unless you want to call the bottom the top and the top the bottom
we're halway out from center spinning around once every 230 million years

your other question (implied) is ... is are our planetary orbits on the same plane as our milky way galactic spinning arms ?

TechHater
TechHater

Do you think these people would have the same level of outrage when they discover that practically every photo they see has similar levels of post production done on them? Talking about photos taken of things on Earth here.

BunnyJinx
BunnyJinx

The bigger portion of your pic is a small cropped section of a much larger picture taken by Hubble of the region in near proximity to a single star.

Attached: Fomalhaut-with-Disk-Ring-and-extrasolar-planet-b.jpg (175 KB, 800x534)

Stark_Naked
Stark_Naked

are our planetary orbits on the same plane as our milky way galactic spinning arms ?

No:

Gigastrength
Gigastrength

i can only hope they'll all kill themselves from the outrage

Spamalot
Spamalot

lmao your photoshoop

Attached: WRONG.png (136 KB, 480x360)

happy_sad
happy_sad

the eye of horus
cia nigger

likme
likme

hey guys what if our ancestors were right and the sun really does orbit the earth but it goes like this
earth orbits the sun
sun orbits the milky way
the milky way orbits the center of the universe
the earth is the center of the universe
therefore the sun orbits the earth

Carnalpleasure
Carnalpleasure

the milky way orbits the center of the universe
this is where you're wrong
the "center of the universe" is everywhere, all points in the universe can be regarded as its perfect center

RavySnake
RavySnake

i'm not talking about a geometric center or a gravitational one but one based upon consciousness itself

CodeBuns
CodeBuns

ah, so you're talking about bullshit, gotcha

Ignoramus
Ignoramus

Your brain also literally pieces together data collected by your two eyeballs, does that mean everything you see with both eyes open is fake because it is a combination of two separate images?
I mean, if you want to get philosophical yes.

Gigastrength
Gigastrength

and then I saw her, the streaming beauty of Aphrodite in the flesh...

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TurtleCat
TurtleCat

A helium balloon will explode in a vacuum chamber and the helium would equilibrate equally in all directions with the chamber, gravity has no effect on this (because it's not real).

Sharpcharm
Sharpcharm

Get out Spirit Science.

Burnblaze
Burnblaze

Just use a stronger balloon.

Nojokur
Nojokur

If the balloon explodes, why would the helium spread out equally in all directions within the chamber?
Even if you are using the argument that gravity is just buoyancy then objects falling in a vacuum still makes sense because there is no denser material (gases) to push them up, and this has been demonstrated.
When the helium is the only material in the vacuum chamber there are no denser gases to push it upwards so why would it spread out equally throughout the chamber? It would logically settle on the bottom.

JunkTop
JunkTop

You don't have to start with a fully-inflated balloon. Just enough so when the chamber reaches vacuum, the pressure of the He doesn't exceed the tensile strength of the latex.

And yes, the balloon would sink like feather on the Moon.

VisualMaster
VisualMaster

WHY TF IS /x/ HERE PRETENDING TO BE SMART. TAKE NOTE THEY ARE TELLING ANYONE WITH SENSE TO VISIT /x/. PLEASE DONT WILLINGLY BECOME FLAT EARTHERS WHO DONT BELIEVE IN GRAVITY OR 9/11

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