How far away is Jupiter from becoming the binary sister to our sun? Does...

Garbage Can Lid
Garbage Can Lid

How far away is Jupiter from becoming the binary sister to our sun? Does jupiter grow over time?

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All urls found in this thread:

quora.com/What-is-the-minimum-mass-required-to-form-a-star
phys.org/news/2017-03-astronomers-purest-massive-brown-dwarf.html
i.4cdn.org/tg/1521935420088.pdf

Harmless_Venom
Harmless_Venom

Far. No.
/thread

Spamalot
Spamalot

This is it.
This is the most retarded question on Veeky Forums

Thank you brainlet.
You have singlehandedly transported us to a parallel universe where not only does nothing make sense, but you are somehow the king. Lord of brainlets. Truly this question could have not been formulated by anything less than exceptional persuit of knowledge but in the opposite direction. You must indeed, actively try to be this much of a brainlet and I refuse to believe this is part of your natural state. I will still hang myself now on a rope made of my own sides using their centripedal force as they now orbit Jupiter as a satellite. Good day sir.

Bidwell
Bidwell

you are 100% correct but you are still an asshole for threading yourself.....

massdebater
massdebater

In Einstein interpretation Time and Space is the same.
Checkmate

iluvmen
iluvmen

quora.com/What-is-the-minimum-mass-required-to-form-a-star

The "minimum size" is only a little larger than Jupiter (by diameter) but 100 times Jupiter's mass. So (with all due respect to Arthur Clarke's "2010") it's not possible it could "ignite".

Jupiter gains mass only from the occasional comet or asteroid which crashes into it. Insignificant.

lostmypassword
lostmypassword

Thank you

hairygrape
hairygrape

Ah, but what if it was a whole boatload of comets?
Huh?

Lord_Tryzalot
Lord_Tryzalot

quora
You'd need approximately 88x the mass of jupiter before it can become a star. not 100x.

Spamalot
Spamalot

Our sun burned out years ago and Jupiter has already been ignited and replaced our old sun. What you see as Jupiter now is a holographic projection on a alien ship

farquit
farquit

Well, technically we already do orbit what's pretty much the barycenter of Jupiter and the sun. If Jupiter orbited closer to the sun than us, and was also on fire, then we could call it a binary star right?

happy_sad
happy_sad

we could grow twice as much weed if Jupiter was a star

askme
askme

If we dropped Saturn, Neptune and Uranus into Jupiter, it would probably triple its mass. Then we'd only need 33x more Jupiters.

PackManBrainlure
PackManBrainlure

I think needs 70-80 something more Jupiter masses. Just to become a brown dwarf.

SniperGod
SniperGod

A second star in the solar system would eject a lot of planets out of the system including earth so its a bad idea all around.

eGremlin
eGremlin

I'm stating a degree in planetary geology.

Very far away. In fact it would need about 100x its mass just to start burning deuterium.

Yes it does grow over time. Many cosmic bodies do grow over time by collecting mass. Jupiter gets increased mass from 3 primary sources:

Solar wind. This adds some mass over time as particles from the sun impact Jupiter. It's effect is extremely minimal and probably can't be measured.

Planetary bodies impacting Jupiter. This adds some mass over time as comets, asteroids, planetesimals, and other debris get caught by Jupiter's gravity and collide with the planet. I don't know if anyone's tried to measure it but this would not be insignificant. Just an educated guess but over its lifetime Jupiter has probably gained about 1% of its total mass this way.

Cosmic rays. This adds some mass over time as particles from interstellar space impact Jupiter. This is also extremely minimal and significantly less than what it gets from Solar wind. For as little as it is it isn't nothing.

Could Jupiter gain enough mass to ignite into a star? Maybe. I can't see it happening though. The pressure from the solar wind, while it does add a nearly insignificant amount of mass to Jupiter also prevents the gas and dust from the interstellar medium from getting in to our solar system Jupiter would need to burn deuterium and be considered a star. When the sun dies that's a different story as the Heliosphere would become largely extinct. Come back and ask again in 10 billion years?

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Dreamworx
Dreamworx

I think it's the extra Jupiter masses that would jack up our orbits, it doesn't need to be a star.

likme
likme

88x the mass of jupiter
you could argue the theoretical lower limit for red dwarfs is closer to 75x though it's not the best thing to nitpick over since there are brown dwarfs (failed stars) larger than that:
phys.org/news/2017-03-astronomers-purest-massive-brown-dwarf.html
~100x is a reasonable answer for something like this

Deadlyinx
Deadlyinx

People have been complaining over self /threading since /threading was invented.

/thread

TreeEater
TreeEater

If 87 comets, all the size of Jupiter, smashed into Jupiter, then perhaps yes.

Nude_Bikergirl
Nude_Bikergirl

100x its mass just to start burning deuterium
not true. 100x would produce a main sequence star, fusing regular hydrogen. below that size, brown dwarfs will process the low hanging fruit like deuterium and lithium, which produces enough light to let us measure their temperatures. without fusion, that wouldn't be the case.

Techpill
Techpill

She used to be a brown dwarf, and humans originated on Ganymede.

So far.

i.4cdn.org/tg/1521935420088.pdf

Garbage Can Lid
Garbage Can Lid

Sounds like a DND setting.

Boy_vs_Girl
Boy_vs_Girl

Are you familiar with the Kelvin-Helmholtz mechanism?
Usually people who are starting degrees don't share information because they don't know what the fuck they are talking about. You should stop being retarded and speculating when you don't really know the answer.

eGremlin
eGremlin

no

Inmate
Inmate

only when venus' orbit gets close enough

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Gigastrength
Gigastrength

Jupiter doesn't grow over time
100% correct
the absolute state of this board

TreeEater
TreeEater

Our sun probably already has a binary sister, we just haven't identified it yet.

PackManBrainlure
PackManBrainlure

Care to share any information that shows he is wrong?

Skullbone
Skullbone

why does it have to be Jupiter? also, if our sun already has a binary, then we should be able to detect it via the sun's orbit, e.g. the 2 stars should be orbiting their barycenter

Nude_Bikergirl
Nude_Bikergirl

Haha no shit. Interesting read none the less.

I'm actually playing Baldur's Gate again right now, so that's funny you said that.

Booteefool
Booteefool

long time
yeah it grows, DUHHH

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