Are the trades a meme?

New_Cliche
New_Cliche

I've been doing Comp Sci at my Uni for 2.5 semesters now and I hate every fucking moment of it. None of the classes interest me, and I feel like I'm wasting hours at the class just to study for 10 min to get what the 1.5 hour lecture was about.

Are the trades a legitimate option for someone with Some College done? If so which trades, and should I work for a union or a small company?

Other urls found in this thread:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polytechnics_Canada
theglobeandmail.com/news/national/low-income-ontario-students-to-get-free-postsecondary-education/article28916789/
youtube.com/watch?v=mViO9mnCTBo

Nude_Bikergirl
Nude_Bikergirl

People here will tell you to avoid unions from what I've seen, but I'm in a trades union and the benefits outweigh the downsides.

10% vacation pay, $6.66 goes to your pension for every hour worked, Saturday and Sunday are double time (soon to be switched to 1.5x time). Good wages too, $40/hr for journeymen. Some downsides are that you get to deal with retards and they have a sort of immunity from being fired, but usually the first to be laid off.

Can answer more if you have anything.

Lunatick
Lunatick

Just as an addendum, I did 2.5 years of Comp. Sci. as well. It's not that I wasn't interested in it, I just smoked too much weed at the time. I'm considering returning to finish, but damn can it be a drag. And expensive.

Booteefool
Booteefool

thanks man, didn't expect anyone to even be up at this hour.

-you mind me asking what trade you're in?

-unions offer better pay and more stable employment as pros, but the cons are bureaucracy and dipshit bosses right?

-are the trades tolling on the body? I have a bad Spine ever since I was a kid, but I figure as an Electrician or Carpenter or something with relatively minimal lifting I should be good.

-do you enjoy it? I just fucking hate that I produce nothing of value and am learning nothing of value in college. Just seems like I was shoved in by my parents

-is it true that there is a significant shortage in trades because of less applications and the labor force of trades growing older?

Thank you so much man

Boy_vs_Girl
Boy_vs_Girl

The union is a joint one. Carpentry and Scaffolding. I'm a scaffolder.

You'll find dipshit bosses on both sides of the fence, honestly. According to the people I've spoken to that have worked non-union, they say the people are worse. More degenerate, sort of. But that could be scaffolding in specific rather than trades in general. Non-union pay is getting to be better in my area, however, and the benefits are coming close but still not the same. Employment definitely tends to be more stable, though. I have access to a private job board through my hall, so there's that.

How hard on the body depends on what trade really. I'd say scaffolding is one of the physically harder trades, not to mention dangerous. Ironworkers also have a hard job. Pipefitters too, but not as bad. Electricians and welders seem to have it easiest in terms of general trades, then there's operators and teamsters, among others. Carpentry is somewhere in the middle, however it depends on what you're doing. Carpentry is a hugely general field, you could be a cabinetmaker or form worker. Both carpentry but very different. Continued.

Soft_member
Soft_member

In general, trades will keep you fit. You'll get to be outside, which has its ups and downs. Where I live, -30C and colder is the norm in the winter. Take from that what you will. I don't like the heat and depending your trade, you may be dealing with a lot of it. I take it day by day, as you should with anything. It's a mixed bag, really. People say it breaks your body, but it depends on how you treat yourself. Eat shitty food and avoid exercise and any job will break your body. Follow a healthy diet and maintain an exercise regimen and you'll be fine in any job. Conversely, I've heard sitting all day is "worse than smoking" for the body. I read about a doctor who did his co-op under a spinal surgeon and he said 70%+ of the people getting surgery were office workers. It's what you make of it. Continued.

Evil_kitten
Evil_kitten

awesome, still here reading these btw, go on as much as you like lol

Also how did you find and feel about going from the classroom to manual labor? tougher than sitting and taking notes? more fulfilling?

SomethingNew
SomethingNew

I gotta add, as an apprentice for any trade you'll be stuck with doing shit jobs until you prove yourself. Electricians do a lot of cable pulling from what I've seen, which isn't that easy.

I don't hate it and I don't love it. The feeling you get after building something nice and useful isn't met by any other, though. There's also the camaradarie you get to experience, which, depending on the people you work with, can be very nice. Keep in mind I've only got experience with scaffolding and carpentry, and a bit of plumbing. There's a whole bunch of other trades out there, some of which look very interesting. If there's any oil/gas industry where you live, look into non-destructive testing and inspecting. Easy as FUCK job, amazing money, and highly valuable. Downside is you gotta do some schooling for it.

Yes there is a big shortage of tradesmen, at least in Canada. The workforce is old as fuck, and a large part of them are retiring. Add to that the influx of people getting degrees and you get the current situation we're in. Continued.

takes2long
takes2long

Lets cut to the chase : which trade has the best pay:labour ratio

From what i gather,being a machine operator is up there with high pay and relativly low physical labour. But why wouldn't every labourer opt for these jobs?

I have a brother who is a site supervisor for a company that builds bridges in northern canada, he makes a ton but its back breaking work as he does most of the same labour the workers he hires to do , he's told me crane operators do almost nothing but get close to 50/60 sometimes close to $80 an hour to show up , move a few things and do nothing the rest of the shift (depending on location)

My main question is : since becoming a crane operator is so lucrative why isnt it something you see alot of people doing? Is this simply a case of people "wanting" to be other things besides the highest payong positions at contruction sites/ skilled trades?

askme
askme

I worked as a scaffolder before I went to university, albeit only for 6 months. In that time I managed to save $15k, which for a financially irresponsible teenager is pretty damn good. I was taking home $1100/week, which I thought was amazing for an 18 year old, at the time anyhow. I did 2.5~ years of school, then went back to scaffolding. At first it was a little difficult, sure, but I've always been in 'decent' shape and so it wasn't a huge change to adapt to. Given that you have a bad spine, your mileage may vary. However, I definitely suggest getting into the gym and working on your body. The ROI of regular exercise is huge, especially as a tradesman. Perhaps with more muscle to support it your spine won't be nearly as bad.

likme
likme

Crane operator is definitely up there. Their pay is entirely dependent on how big of a crane they operate is, too. But fuck does it look like a boring job. It's also extremely difficult to get into without nepotism. There are courses you can take at polytechnics for it, but still, higher supply vs lower demand. Crane operators guard their jobs like fat chicks and food.

Welding inspectors, plant operators and NDT technicians do the least work and get paid the most. Of course, if you're a supervisor or general foreman of any trade, you'll be doing very little work and being paid extremely well. Construction safety officers get paid very well too, and do FUCK ALL other than act as a total leech on productivity. Hmmm, what else. Teamsters do sweet fuck all and get paid like the rest of the trades. They just drive vehicles around site.

lostmypassword
lostmypassword

I gave crane operator a lot of consideration a few years ago. It's too much responsibility and too boring. With the biggest cranes, one mistake and people die, millions of dollars gets destroyed, etc. It's not worth it in my eyes.

Poker_Star
Poker_Star

I'm pretty strong (SS + GOMAD lmao) and fit (9 minute 1.5 mile) I'm used to 12 hour shifts

Could I get into scaffolding?

Gigastrength
Gigastrength

alright man going to look intro Electrician work, I'm already moderately strong because I hit the gym often, back is just fucked genetically.

Thanks a fuckton for all the info though, appreciate it a lot

Techpill
Techpill

Absolutely. There are women who do the job and while they're not good at it, they hold their own. Just depends on if there's a demand for it where you live. I'm sure you'd do fine with those stats. As a note, I've worked much longer shifts than 12s but it's not the norm. Longest for me was 23 hours. I made over $1k that day.

No problem. Commercial electrician work will be much different than industrial electrician work, though. Not sure what your area has demand for.

ZeroReborn
ZeroReborn

Jobs like NDT technician/welding supervisor and construction safety officers are jobs that are highly competetive no? Do you need to have related work experience or is it a do-the-schooling-and-apprentenship then get a job type things?

I wonder if nepotism would play a high role in those or if you can find a job relativly easily after youve been trained and are free to move anywhere in the country to work?

I have a plan to work something high paying in contruction and then buying /renting out heavy equipment to construction companies to make money on the side or relax/focusing on that as a main source of income

CodeBuns
CodeBuns

Welding inspector and CSO require hours in the field as well as education, iirc. CSO needs 3 years I believe. Welding inspector probably requires journeyman certification and then inspection education. I'm not absolutely sure about the former, but I know inspecting requires education. Even if you're a helper for an NDT tech, you're still going to need schooling. That sort of thing has a ton of standards around it. It's kind of like how engineers are the only ones able to sign off on blueprints and such.

Nepotism always comes in handy in the trades. It's how I got into scaffolding. But it's only helpful for getting your foot in the door. Once you have that, finding jobs becomes a lot easier. However, there's something called namehiring in the union world. It's where you bypass hiring procedures because somebody specifically requested you to be hired through the hall. Nepotism comes in handy there because for example, your dad could be a foreman somewhere and namehire you even though the company might not actually be hiring. Hope that makes sense.

You might be a few years too late with that plan, however barring that, it's a good plan. There are so many people that have done just that in Alberta. And now they're millionaires. Mind you, they had the oil boom is capitalize on. Right now is not the best time for that. Undercutting United Rentals would get you somewhere, though. Fuck those jews.

StrangeWizard
StrangeWizard

I operate pretty much anything but a crane.

2 juco drop out.

Work alone loading trucks and shitposting all day.

Take home after taxes was like 60k and they pay insurance, 20 bucks towards phone, give 1 or 2 40 hour week christmas bonuses and a hoodie, and give 2 weeks vacation when i hit my 3 year in march.

They laid back and treat me well. Will be here till i get rich or die.

I did pipelining and construcktion till i fell out of a church roof and shatered my cankle... now i sit a lot. Trades arent bad if u like what u do. U wont get rich but its ok pay and keeps u active.

Stupidasole
Stupidasole

One of my role models told me "you'll never get rich bringing a lunchbox to work" in reference to working in the trades, and while he's absolutely right, you can definitely make enough to be happy and secure.

Nojokur
Nojokur

60k after taxes

Jesus Christ how do you get that much pay? From what I see an Electrician Median salary is about 52k a year BEFORE taxes

Spazyfool
Spazyfool

You're looking in the wrong places, bro. Journeyman electricians make 100k in Alberta, even more if there's lots of work.

Nude_Bikergirl
Nude_Bikergirl

NDT technician seems up my alley and yeah i know there would for sure be training/education/certification required to do any sort of inspecting type job. My concerns were more along the line of "oh so i did 3 years of schooling for this and cant find any jobs" but it seems NDT technician is a bit of an umbrella term that covers a couple different "inspector" type jobs. Which ofc opens up job prospects. Youve been a tremendous help as I'd never even heard of the NDT technician job , i have one more question and ill stop bothering you. In terms of age do construction companies really give a shit? Im currently 24 and have 0 construction experience. Assuming i finish my training and by 26/27 end up as a Level 1 NDT technician after the schooling, do companies give a shit that id be hitting close to 30 ? It seems a bit stupid but i really know very little about the contruction industry.

And oh man ive heard about the price gouging from united and other companies, my bet was to get my older brother to rent out my equipment as he runs a site (he is whatever is above foreman, site supervisor i think) so he does the rental and hiring for build sites. Not sure of the legallity but theres always loopholes

Booteefool
Booteefool

goddamn, what makes an electrician paid more in a certain location? just lack of supply and high demand?

I live in AZ so that may be it, but 100k is insane. Nonetheless I'd like to still live in a suburban/urban area as an electrician.

King_Martha
King_Martha

I mean, I can't see the absence of construction experience being the reason for you not getting a job, all else being the same. But having some experience can't help. It's a much different world than what most people are used to. I couldn't cut it as a field service technician for a communications company because things were too different and strange, and so I left. It'll be even weirder coming from a retail or whatever else kind of job. Just saying. But if you have that certification, companies can't really say shit. And from what I've seen, there's a demand for NDT guys. It's not something a lot of people go to school for. Like you said, you'd never even heard of it before. I hadn't before actually working in the field, either. I highly suggest going for it if there's demand where you live.

Hours, unions, companies, what sort of work it is and where it's being done. Look at it this way: a small-time electrician company that wires houses isn't going to be doing the same caliber of work that a huge company doing the work for a new gas plant will be doing, and as such won't be able to pay the same money. The dangers are greater in industrial settings as well.

SniperWish
SniperWish

Ndt tech on a job site here:

Go get your cedo ticket to get your foot in the door. After you're in with a company get your mag and dye tickets, then work towards ultrasonics or radiography level 2 tickets and you're set.

Oh yeah get your CWB visual inspection tickets as soon as you can too.

TurtleCat
TurtleCat

Where do you live/work?

RumChicken
RumChicken

I'm heading to a trade school in a month, I was lucky enough to run into an alumni of the school and he told me it took him about 6 months after he graduated to get his apprenticeship, 4 years later he's officially a journeyman and has already made 170k this year with taking off January and February. It depends on what trade you want to get in to, some are obviously going to pay more than others but you'll also have take bigger risks and work longer for the higher paying trades.

StonedTime
StonedTime

Eastern Canada

CouchChiller
CouchChiller

Also to add about Crane operators:

My girlfriends grandpa has been a plumber for 30 years so he's done some big projects on skyscrapers and shit, Hes said he's had Crane operators on job sites he has worked at that were sleeping on the job and making close to 100 dollars an hour. He's probably exaggerating a bit but they do make some insane amounts of money

DeathDog
DeathDog

Right the fuck on, Canadiabro.

To everyone else, believe this guy. It's not unheard of for NDT workers to make 150-200k after a few years. And it's a pretty damn easy job, from what I've seen.

TechHater
TechHater

It's really not exaggeration, man. I've seen it firsthand. They're always reading books or watching videos on their phones. Wouldn't put it past them to sleep on the job either.

PurpleCharger
PurpleCharger

It is a super stressful job at times though with the responsibilities they have.

CodeBuns
CodeBuns

Yeah, that's what I said earlier in the thread. One mistake and people die, millions of dollars are lost, etc. Not something for me.

New_Cliche
New_Cliche

Im looking into the certification and CINDE offers like 5 day courses to get shit like EDDY certificate and other things. But i noticed mohawk college in hamilton , ontario has a 2 year NDT technician course that seemingly covers all the different testing types .

This is all quite confusing ,what do you need to get certified in to get yourself a job? Id rather not spend 6grand and 2 years to get an NDT technician job when it seems i could start working after a few 5 day certification courses .

whereismyname
whereismyname

Ahh sorry I didn't even read most of the thread before posting obviously haha. You seem to know your shit though man and are giving out good advice, hopefully the right guy reads it and capitalizes on it.

Fried_Sushi
Fried_Sushi

The Mohawk course isn't terrible, and it will give you everything you need to be certified across all methods, except work hours.

Or you can take a 1-2 week cedo course through Cinde SAIT nait etc. go work for a company and take the other method courses as you grow your career.

All depends on time, income, and temperament

girlDog
girlDog

Im a bit skeptical that a company would hire somebody who just finished a 1-2 week course/certification . are CEDO certified NDT technicians in short supply? Im just curious as to why you reccomend that certification first. What order would you reccomend someone to certify themselves in?
What are the hours/the job itself like?

I mean im gonna assume you know better then me haha

iluvmen
iluvmen

Cedo is a 1-2 week course then you go work for a company that trains you in house. You can write your nrcan certification before or after that time.

Every other Ndt method has both a written and practical certification exam. Cedo is your starter ticket to get in with a company that also does the other methods.

A cedo basically operates a camera for gamma radiography and every gig is different.

You might get on a pipeline crew and make big bucks for long shifts living away, or you might work in town in a fab or pipe shop.

Radiography usually = one trine and shift diff pay when you're working in town though.

How much lugging you do depends on what needs to be shot

RumChicken
RumChicken

You were a huge help
Im in the process of looking up more info on the job but im pretty certain i will pursue this. Thanks to everyone in the thread.

Harmless_Venom
Harmless_Venom

No, the trades are not a meme. What IS a meme is this idea that you can do a year of trade school and start making fat stacks. Doesn't work that way. Skilled workers are in high demand, but apprentices are not skilled, and no one is going to be in a hurry to give you a chance. This should be obvious but you would be amazed by the number of people who don't understand it. If you're lucky enough to get an apprenticeship you will have to deal with at least four years of bullshit.

That shouldn't be a deterrent though. A career in a good, certified trade can be very rewarding,and nothing worth doing is easy.

JunkTop
JunkTop

Honestley i got really lucky. These guys are good churchgoing family run business of like 20 quarries and farms etc... i been working 40-60 miles away at another quarry and when they put the shack in near town i knew they would hire someone. They daid no so i went to thier other quarry and got an app and photoshopped it for this quarry. Filled it out and turned it in by hand. I daid id happily fill in another form when they print them up but i wanted to be first in line. They called and hired me the next day.

Then I played super employee. They gave me a list of shit to do over the next 6 months and left. I was so happy to be out of my last job in a fucking north keorean labor camp i would come out on saturdays and sundays and dick around getting shit done off the clock. My life was work. I was bored enough to come pick up trash...

Then they gave me a $1 raise.

Then a few months latter they came for the water pump. The suction hose was heavy and hung in the rocks so i couldnt pick it up. Figured fuckit. Was 100 degrees and i was pissy and hot so i emptied my pockets and dove in 10 foot of water. Pic up on the screen end and raise it out of water so i could roll it up.

Bossman owner shows up at perfect timing. Sees im gone

omfg he fell and hit his head and died wut do.

Then here my fat ass comes up with what felt like a billion pound hose. After we got it tidied up i notice he stopped and check out my jeesus fish emblem on the car i had bought that was already there.

He bought me dinner and gave me a $2 raise.

Just shit like that. These guys figure if u hire quality help and pay well then u get good employees.

Im so far away from there office that i take care of all the shit here and babysit another quarry nearby.

Im not dumb i know they check on shit so i keep my office and loader clean and almost always grease like i should. Ihavent called in sick in 3 years and find someone working a "filler" job to cover for me.

Carnalpleasure
Carnalpleasure

This is so hard to read that i didn't bother even reading. please learn how to structure a coherent thought and i hope someone teaches you english someday

BlogWobbles
BlogWobbles

NDT technician here.

Schooling is available and does give you a bit of a leg up, but not required. Each inspection method has individual requirements that must be met to become certified.

Available work vs the amount of available people is greatly in our favor. So jobs are pretty easy to come by. Nepotism plays a large part in getting jobs, but mostly that's because most people aren't even aware NDT is a thing.

Physically it's very easy, but be prepared for most of your work to be seasonally based around the spring and fall. During those times you'll usually work 6-7 days a week 12 hrs a day.

Any other questions, feel free to ask

FastChef
FastChef

Tons of winter work for NDT guys in Canada.

New_Cliche
New_Cliche

I'm not Canadian. Guess that's a bit of info I left out. All my experience is based in US.

Illusionz
Illusionz

Are there any programs where you get to learn a bunch of trades in one, like carpentry, pluming and electrician together, or is that too much and you have to pick one and specialize heavily in it?

What are some schools and programs that are worth to go to?
Did Canada roll out that Student Grant where if you make less than 50k you can go to school almost for free?

Where would you check what trades are in demand in Canada?

Nude_Bikergirl
Nude_Bikergirl

I haven't heard of any program like that. The point of education is to specialize in one thing and become proficient with that, even if that one thing is a general field, like computer science for example.

Alberta has SAIT and NAIT which are good polytechnics. I don't know about the rest of Canada though.

I haven't heard anything about a student grant like that. It's about $8500 for one year of school at a respected university here. Trade schools will be lower, albeit marginally. You can expect a year of schooling to cost you $14-20k including living.

Look on Indeed.com and see what is in demand.

Methnerd
Methnerd

What are some schools and programs that are worth to go to?

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polytechnics_Canada
That's a list of well-known technical schools, but every province has at least one public trade college. This is not academia, as long as the program is accredited you will be fine.

Did Canada roll out that Student Grant where if you make less than 50k you can go to school almost for free?

I don't know what you mean, post-secondary education is already heavily subsidized in this country, no one spends more than a small fraction of what the program actually costs. That said, if you are on EI or have been on EI within the last few years the Canadian government will pay for you to go to a private trade school.

idontknow
idontknow

theglobeandmail.com/news/national/low-income-ontario-students-to-get-free-postsecondary-education/article28916789/

happy_sad
happy_sad

I was a chemical engineer. I became an electrician when I was 27.

I make about the same, but my job is better, I'm also more relied on. Im not sitting at a desk most of the day but Im happier as an electrician union member. My life outside of work is better too.

cum2soon
cum2soon

What pay were you making at both if you don't mind me asking? Also how was the office environment vs trades environment? How did it improve your out of work life?

massdebater
massdebater

Crane operators make that. I worked for a family owned company that owned a crane and drove to different job sites and the company paid the operator a flat $100/hr. He worked about 20 hours a week.

Gigastrength
Gigastrength

I made 70k working for Monsanto. I make 84k as an electrician in an industrial setting for a corn milling facility. I could make more (100k+) for being on call or working nights and stuff but Im not really interested at the moment.

Deadlyinx
Deadlyinx

Can confirm user, I worked construction safety for a year and did literally nothing but drive around in a golf cart all day fucking with the workers, and type some things in excel for about 5 minutes a day. Also got to go to lunch basically whenever I wanted and nobody could tell me shit.
And I got paid 18.75/hr

Firespawn
Firespawn

Goddamn 84k as an industrial electrician?

How hard is it to get an industrial electrician job if you're a licensed journeyman? Also the licenses carry across states right?

FastChef
FastChef

I've been in HVAC for 7 years and just started my own company last July. Little over a year and I made $90K NET doing residential 3-4 days a week. I live in Texas and live like a king. Been to every Cowboys game this year, bought a boat, my family came to visit and we went to a Texas A&M game while staying in a 4 star hotel. Feels good. My Uncle has helped a lot though and has been a good mentor for me. He's ran his own handy man business since I was a little kid, mostly painting and landscaping. But he showed me a lot things about running a business. I also have a good mentor through SCORE.

JunkTop
JunkTop

Its a lot to get into.

At Monsanto if there was a cut back (which for such a huge company is kind of a meme) then what are you going to do? You cant out-work someone else so everything falls back to politics. Also keep in mind you can easily be replaced by some kid from some shit university for 45k a year which he is more than happy to accept because nobody else is calling him. It doesnt matter how smart he is, or how hard of a worker he is. Hes doing shit you could pay someone $12 hours to do.

Being an electrician, there are no politics. There are no stupid people that cant look at wiring diagrams. I had my first kid when I worked for Monsanto and got 2 days off. I just had my 2nd kid and Im being given a month off (with pay) and it wasnt even an issue. Im relied on and consulted with, and my job isnt really competitive. People can either do the job or they cant. Knowing your someone that "can" is great. Being that guy grants you a level of importance.

Im not going to debate the value of a degree but I wish I became an electrician when I was 20 instead of 27.

Evil_kitten
Evil_kitten

How do you go about acquiring customers in a business like that? Do you rent a shop? Any other information you have is much appreciated.

Methshot
Methshot

Noticed there is a math proficiency test before you are even allowed to any courses relating to NDT certification. Did you take it ? I feel like just going for it im unsure of what evel of math would test . websites are quite vague

Aside from that would you recommend getting CEDO ticket first to get a foot in the door (like other user said) or should i look at job postings and see what they are hiring for?

iluvmen
iluvmen

Word of mouth, and getting your business on Google Maps when people search "HVAC <your zip code>"

People just throw away or lose business cards. I'll make magnets that I give new customers to put on their fridge. I also got signs on my van which has some people coming up asking questions in person. And they just put my number in their contacts because smartphones exist. Business cards are obsolete and a waste of money for businesses. Really only useful for white collar professionals networking.

My garage is my shop.

DeathDog
DeathDog

STAY OUT OF MY CANADA WE'RE FULL!!!

AwesomeTucker
AwesomeTucker

I remember always being told that if i wanted an easy life, to do engineering, or some kind of STEM
it's all a fucking ruse to keep competition low for the high earning, versatile majors like political science.
The people who have the money and control public opinion surrounding education are fine with this, simply because it means less competition for their own kids for these degrees
DONT FALL FOR THE STEM/Business MEME
Political science and humanities are where the money really is.

I wish I had someone to tell me this while I was at uni, people will try to discredit this but do NOT TRUST THEM, political science and humanities are where the real money is, no one wants anyone else to know this.
They'll do all they can to make you think otherwise.

Supergrass
Supergrass

I didn't take any classes prior. I found a company hiring a NDT assistant. Did that for approximately a year which allowed me to get my required field hours for a few different testing methods. The company I was working for at the time paid for the classes at that point. After the class time and field experience are accumulated you can take the certification test for whichever methods you meet the requirements for. The classes are very easy. I also didn't have to take any math proficiency test prior.

Need_TLC
Need_TLC

Hey OP, were you particularly interested in comp sci. when you began?
I want to transfer my major but I've already switched a couple times and I'm afraid of never committing and falling for the greener grass meme.

Raving_Cute
Raving_Cute

Forgot to add that you can search websites like ndt.org and roadtechs for jobs.

Boy_vs_Girl
Boy_vs_Girl

What does Veeky Forums think of Solar Energy Technician?
Seems like it's the future. Good skilled trade to get into.

SomethingNew
SomethingNew

Saftey guy. U know everyone there wished everyday u'd flip that cart and burn to death right.

All u safety guys i have met but like 1 were a Huuuuge cuckfag.

takes2long
takes2long

PKEASE SUCK THE FATTEST END OF MY DICK TODAY. ...FAGGOT.

Not enough give a fuck to read but enough give a fuck to shitpost and whine about it. Fine, u english better than me pleb. U happy?

5mileys
5mileys

Computer science seems like a humanities-tier major for autists. The people I know who work with computers are self-taught and got their job through connections and personality.

whereismyname
whereismyname

it may be different for canada, i'm checking the CINDE website for ontario and it seems either you need good marks from when you were in highschool (i did terribly average so i would need to take this test i believe) or do that math test thing

Aside from that, How did you get hired as an NDT assistant? most lowest skilled NDT related job postings i've seen all require SOME sort of certification at atleast lvl 1. How did you manage to swing a job as an "assistant" ?

Oh i was wondering if you can take your lvl 1 - lvl 3 certification classes/exams consecutively? from what i see on the CINDE website it says the only prereqs. for taking the lvl 2 and 3 certs are to have already done the prior lvl within 10 years.

So by my understanding, in a couple months i could get all or most of my lvl 3's without any actual work experience (assuming i had gotten no work between courses) is this a correct assumption or would i be rejected by most companies because i went that way ? it seems it makes the most sense as lvl 3's get paid the most and being level 3 pretty much opens you up to the majority of job openings (barring ones that need experience)

Supergrass
Supergrass

Sorry m8 just felt like being a prick , but i'll admit, it did take some re-reading to understand

Boy_vs_Girl
Boy_vs_Girl

Don't you want to work next to a glistening Adonis like that? Maybe you'll bump into him accidentally...

happy_sad
happy_sad

Another Union Sparky (IBEW Local 1, St Louis) here. I've been doing it since I quit Comp Sci about 20 years ago. Being a Journeyman Inside Wireman is fun stuff. I have worked on all sorts of cool projects, from Boeing's F15 Hangar to the new Busch Stadium to GM's Assembly Robots to a new MRI machine installed at Barnes' Children's Hospital. I make good money and can take my card anywhere in the country and test easily into whatever state license I need to work (I've taken and passed Iowa and Colorado's Journeyman Licenses which are reciprocal to much of the country).

Pic is me at the bottom of the inside of a smoke stack under the GM plant last January putting up temp lites for the cleaning crew.

This video is truth.

youtube.com/watch?v=mViO9mnCTBo

Inmate
Inmate

Yes, trades are a meme.

Literally any good wage you get now at a trade will tank out in a few years when the markets are flooded with tradesmen.

SomethingNew
SomethingNew

You're an idiot.

Garbage Can Lid
Garbage Can Lid

From what I've seen level 3 jobs are pretty much writing procedures, certifying new level 2 techs, and teaching classes. Level 2 are the people who do the actual inspections. There are many more level 2 jobs out there than 3 and even if you are a level 3, you'll get paid a level 2 wage for doing level 2 work.

Assistant would be a job position under level 1. Basically just do small tasks and observe the level 2 that you are working with. I completely skipped level 1 certification and went straight to level 2 since I was able to aquire my field hours as an assistant. Different levels apply individually per certification, so you could be a level 2 in ultrasonic testing, but an assistant in radiographic testing. Each method have different requirements.

As far as getting level 3 without work experience I don't think it's possible. I've never looked into the requirements, but I know level 2 requires X amount of hours in the field with another certified technician for each testing method.

These are all based on experience and knowledge about how we do it in the states. I'm honestly not sure how much is the same in Canada. Such as me skipping level 1

farquit
farquit

Sounds like how slaves lived lol tradecuck

viagrandad
viagrandad

Crane operator is definitely up there.
Just chiming in with a healthy kek. Nice thread.

Nude_Bikergirl
Nude_Bikergirl

Yeah, I bet the slaves made 100k/year too. If you can't brave the winter in Canada, that's a you problem, not a me problem. Whatever makes you feel better though, insulting blue collar workers is something retards do.