I work as a trading strategist

RumChicken
RumChicken

I work as a trading strategist. Ok.Pic related, it's of actual financial market

DeathDog
DeathDog

u can ask me shit if u want

eGremlin
eGremlin

So there is a financial market for normies and the "actual market"?

Fuzzy_Logic
Fuzzy_Logic

I guess in a way? Companies have access to brokers and could cut a deal but it's rare. Dynamics of trading large quantities of shares makes it a lot different than what normies have to do. You can pic stock and buy it, but fior an institution a lot more consideration has to be given. All things considered its probably easiest to be a crooked institutional manager (a lot of hedge funds), retail investor, then legit institutional investor (e.g. schwab)

Stupidasole
Stupidasole

So what happened in 95 to make it start going crazy?

Nojokur
Nojokur

It's rare in the case of US Equities****

Fried_Sushi
Fried_Sushi

idk. something about internet. wont catch on tho

AwesomeTucker
AwesomeTucker

Bet you didn't make 200% gains on HTGM faggot

StrangeWizard
StrangeWizard

I work on execution side. And have trading restriction so I couldn't if I wanted to. Also neither did u fag

Fried_Sushi
Fried_Sushi

Is it best to leave your money with a financial professional to invest, or manage yourself for higher reward. I'm in my mid-twenties with ability to invest 20k a year I'd say. I want it dumped in high risk/high reward areas because if I lose it I'm not leaving children or a wife hungry.

All that said, I've worked with individuals who do this for a living and I maybe see 5-10% return and reservation about high risk investments. I've opened my own Merrill edge to see how I do myself and I've stayed even over six month.

I'm just looking for some decent kickback. I have a standard retirmentment that I'm dumping 6% in which is what my employer matches. I'm looking for more now. Thoughts?

RumChicken
RumChicken

I'm also in my mid-20s, and like I said more on the execution side. That said, in the short/medium term ETFs/index funds are the place to be. Any company meeting of an honest active manager would say the same. How you diversify is up to you and how much time you want to devote it.

Up until recently I can tell you that my split was about 40% in a vanguard target date fund, 35% in SPY (it's probably more exposure but I havent dug into my vanguard fund) and about 10% discretionary invesments.Remaining 5% or so is cash. These are very rough estimates.

In a market like this, as someone who believe in value investing, it's really, really hard for me to tell you that SPY is where it's at when it's so clearly overvalued, but any value investor has been saying that for at least 2 years.

In my opinion, but not many "experts", it's worth playing with some money. Set aside a percent you're comfortable with, proportional with your confidence and amount of time you want to spend. It should not be more than like 25% which is very generous,m and assumes you have massive confidence and tons of time. Given that you have a job, I doubt that's the case. I think, conservatively, take about 5%. Learning to invest is a valuable thing.

Paying a financial professional is stupid. They're going to eat 1% of your conributions a year and depending on what happens under Trump, possibly steer you into non-ideal investments. Definitely choose your own funds, and if you're diversified you have nothing to worry about - you will always be in the middle ground. If you want risk, invest in US equities, they've been hot. That said, I'd recommend ETFs and diversified mutual funds, particularly benchmark-free ones where you agree with their sentiments, or at least understand their arguments.

Definitely keep contributing. Dollar-cost averaging is the most powerful way to make money on investments.

I think this is a bit of a weaselly, answer, and I apologize,

VisualMaster
VisualMaster

If I were you 20 year olds just pick ten different things that absolutely go up over time like snp Dow etfs ira and put 10% in either maybe save 10 percent for blackjack or poker or bitcoin for fun. Real estate is where the money is too.

eGremlin
eGremlin

mid 20s in the same situation as the guy you replied to.

Any company meeting of an honest active manager would say the same.

But doesnt that worry you though? Maybe ive been brainwashed by the all the goldbugs in the crypto community, but theres lots of confidence and yhis is an ATH, so why is now a good time to start buying?

PurpleCharger
PurpleCharger

this is pretty good advice. If you want reasoning check out benjamin graham's intelligent investor or anything by Bogle. I'd never endorse crypto, and the pump and dump schemes of this board is why. 10 etfs/funds are probably too much. The goal is diversification.

Dreamworx
Dreamworx

I'm someone who lives in New Zealand, and I wish to get involved in trading derivatives (futures and options) in US and European markets. As an amateur lone wolf, do you have any tips for me in getting started? I have about $5k NZD available immediately and would be looking to get started near years end.

5mileys
5mileys

I don't think now is a good time to start buying, but dollar cost averaging should even it out. In fact if you're a speculator I think it's a terrible time to buy. As far as cryptos, to me, it's pure speculation. Any thread on this board proves it. It's like trying to determine value for something like snap but times 1000 because there are no assets at all

hairygrape
hairygrape

Sorry dude, no idea. I'm mainly equities

BlogWobbles
BlogWobbles

Ok thanks. One more question: suppose theres a student loan bubble and it pops. What investments would be most affected?

takes2long
takes2long

can you rate my portfolio

Dreamworx
Dreamworx

Just google 'student loan stocks' but you could imagine Navient, Nelnet, Sallie Mae going down on such news.

CouchChiller
CouchChiller

For all you young idiots with lots of time ahead of you. Just wait for the next bear market to start, then wait 1-2 years and load up. Anything else at this point in the bull market is insane. This is the longest bull market in history now, it will end sooner or later. Not if but when.
So the smartest thing you can do now is to understand CASH IS KING and that means to always just TRADE and do not INVEST yet. In and out like the wind, take your profits and run. Always back to cash.
The only scary thing is that this time around the bubble might be a total reset of the fiat currency market system in that case your CASH will also get a huge % adjustment. So it can't hurt to own some silver bullion on the side.
Pic related.

Dreamworx
Dreamworx

Oh, another pro-ETF guy on Veeky Forums. Fucking finally I was getting tired of all those stock holding newbies

What do you think would be the least risky ETFs to go with in case the stock market enters turbulence under Trump's anti-status quo policies? I personally believe that having a [2:2:1] portfolio of [staples ETF : healthcare ETF : foreign cash like CHF] would be the most optimal way to go with. Best case scenario, you cushion a crash, worst case scenario, you gain a good enough performance due to those sectors underperforming. It's literally a win-win. I don't even understand how people trade solitary stocks anymore

RavySnake
RavySnake

zooms out

VisualMaster
VisualMaster

there's some crazy high yield preferred shares out there.

Barclays has one that is basically a straight line for years and years that pays out over 7% in dividends every year. It's been callable since 2013 but I believe they haven't called it because there some sort of litigation going on. BCS PRD. It could be called at 25 dollars a share at any time, don't bother investing in it now.

whereismyname
whereismyname

Because having a few good solitary stocks can exceed the returns of a bunch of ETFs/indexes.

iluvmen
iluvmen

I'd buy guns and food and a bunker learn how to survive when the financial market crashes. Next gold silver metals then it doesn't matter what you invest in do 40% etfs then 40% risky investments but also an IRA and retirement. Buy some nice homes in a rich neighborhood and rent them out pure profit.

Emberfire
Emberfire

buy nice homes in a rich neighborhood

Are you in high school? Where are you getting 5-20% for these nice homes?

AwesomeTucker
AwesomeTucker

Everything looks linear on log scale, no matter what the underlying trend is.

King_Martha
King_Martha

Because the trend is ALWAYS UP long after you are dead, your children are dead, your grandchildren are dead, your grandchildren's children are dead and their grandchildren's children's children are dead.