Leaving the NEET Life Behind

PackManBrainlure
PackManBrainlure

Calling all Programmers / IT workers...

NEET here, was thinking about getting into programming to make a career out of. I used to make shitty Windows Batch RPGs and VBS bots that would do shit for me, but that was all quite some time ago. I loved it though, and I've always been interested in systems design, like Operating Systems and code that gets as close as possible to controlling real processes.

If I were to go to a community college and get some certs for different programming languages, how do I distinguish between the meme-certs and the actual ones that could land me an IT job in programming, whether remotely or in an office?

Sick of being a NEET; I just want to be a normie with a fucking job that I can at least tolerate, even if it means working alongside Pradesh from LooLand.

/blogpost
inb4 "NEET master race enlightenment"
fuck this life

All urls found in this thread:

youtube.com/watch?v=5RQoptKWeQQ

StonedTime
StonedTime

Im the opposite, im a web developer who dreams of one day becoming a neet again.

As for your question, i cant help you. I did a three month bootcamp and then got a 6 figure job afterwards, fully remote. Still work there 2 years later. Never went to college

Supergrass
Supergrass

I have worked alongside the most incomplete human beings I've ever met who could barefly debug let alone write good code and believe me, to be a programmer, all you need to do really is make fucking programs.

Inmate
Inmate

which camp fambro?

StonedTime
StonedTime

do you have a good mind for algos? been studying for a few years but i'm starting to realize i'm a brainlet compared to the best devs, considering transitioning into the business side of things...

ZeroReborn
ZeroReborn

This, I am interested. I do not take NEET life for granted, but I do have some desires I'd like to work toward before I move back into a more /comfy/ 10-hour/wk NEET-ish life.

Yes, but to first get into those positions, you need to have experience or accolades that demonstrate your proficiency. Which languages should I start with? .NET? VBasic? C#?

AwesomeTucker
AwesomeTucker

Certs are mostly for network and ops. Cisco, A+, Red Hat, Microsoft etc. All other are memes.

Get a book, get good, post on github to make a portfolio of work. Let ur cometence and expertise be ur cert.

Raving_Cute
Raving_Cute

whats

Evil_kitten
Evil_kitten

If I were to go to a community college and get some certs for different programming languages, how do I distinguish between the meme-certs and the actual ones that could land me an IT job in programming, whether remotely or in an office?
You do not need a degree to get a programming job and "certs" are legitimately a meme. Not just "lol that's a meme bro", I mean they count for fucking nothing. No serious company cares about programming certs. They either want a CS degree or they want a killer portfolio OR amazing experience. You have to know your stuff, that's it. Go into web or mobile. If you can't afford a real degree, do not go to college.

haveahappyday
haveahappyday

Mathematically or procedurally? Before I flunked out of uni, I had finished a multivariable calc (3) at the top of the class, so I'd say my mathematics skills are pretty sharp. As for logic/procedure, I'm not too sure.

Excellent advice, thank you. What sorts of projects do you recommend dabbling in? I was hoping to maybe one day contribute to open source platforms and build a portfolio that way. I have a basic knowledge of object-oriented programming, and now I'm just looking for the most versatile and most popular languages to learn that aren't memes.

WebTool
WebTool

I cannot afford a real degree senpai, that's honestly why I'm here searching for the next best thing. I don't want to be a debt slave, after getting a taste of it before. I will ditch the hope for certs and start to build a portfolio as a previous user suggested.

How much experience do you think is worthwhile for an employer? If I dedicated the next ~6 months to developing AFTER picking up some knowledge, do you think I could flesh out a reasonable setup? Thanks.

StonedTime
StonedTime

Before I flunked out of uni, I had finished a multivariable calc (3) at the top of the class
good

What sorts of projects do you recommend dabbling in?
Not him but try to set up a network request that give you an array of JSON objects and use those JSON objects to build custom models and load them into a UITableView with lazy loading of images using SD Web Image Library for image caching. Building an application that does that will make you very viable for job hunting. That's just one example.

It depends on what kind of job you want, but they want to see evidence that you can deliver. (And that you're not a fucking autist.)

Raving_Cute
Raving_Cute

How much experience do you think is worthwhile for an employer? If I dedicated the next ~6 months to developing AFTER picking up some knowledge, do you think I could flesh out a reasonable setup? Thanks.

Real talk: If you can dedicate your soul to this for 6 months and put in legit 50+ hour work weeks, you can be employable (read: willing to relocate for $15 an hour) in 3 months. But if you're a lazy, undisciplined person, it will take years. You need to put in the hours.

BunnyJinx
BunnyJinx

I went from NEET to self-employed thanks to programming. If you are good and develop good products on your own then you don't even need to get a job.

Dreamworx
Dreamworx

self-employed
Unless you are bringing in $10k a year or shilling your own Java shit to businesses, I'd love to know what you do, user

Nude_Bikergirl
Nude_Bikergirl

Best advice I've gotten from anyone so far, thank you. Idea = saved, already have a window up to check out JSON. Do you recommend JSON for web dev jobs, or more for jobs that involve utilization of data (in the sense that you're retrieving data with JSON for the app)?

I have no problem dedicating myself to something -- I need some structure anyways, otherwise I end up dwelling here all day or getting caught up watching YT for hours in my bored NEET stupor. Only true hobby I have is being /fit/.

Awesome, do you do computer applications and live off of purchases or do you do web dev? Interested in your story.

Stark_Naked
Stark_Naked

Do you recommend JSON for web dev jobs, or more for jobs that involve utilization of data
You need to know how to work with JSON because it's everywhere by everything.

The jobs you're going to be able to get at first are entry-level positions at small companies, startups, places willing to either pay you nothing to do a lot or take a chance on you in general. Personally I got into mobile dev as it's relatively young and easy to get into. A significant number of developers in mobile have no degree or an unrelated degree—probably half of everyone I've met.

Anyway, all of these require JSON. The example app I mentioned is just a proof of concept to show an employer that you can do the basics. 90% of what you'll be doing as a junior dev is working with data you receive over a network from a remote API (using JSON generally), manipulating that data in some way, maybe letting a user work with that data, and finally storing it in a database (in the case of mobile this is handled seamlessly by e.g. Apple's Core Data, for web dev you'd be using something like Mongo or whatever).

For the person hiring for the kinds of jobs you'll be able to get, the most important stuff in order: Does this guy know JSON/databases/his language of choice? Can he actually produce (is it published on the App Store? does he have real experience with this? open source contribution etc. They want to see if you can ship a product.) Up next, CS fundamentals; searching, sorting, binary trees, big O, etc. Next: Would I have a beer with this guy? Can he work in a team? Can he communicate effectively?

having no degree is bad but it's not really any worse than having a degree but no portfolio, experience, or SKILLS.
If you have skills + portfolio you look better to some employers than a 22-year-old with a CS degree from Bumfuck University and nothing to show for it.

also experience > *

tl;dr: it's doable, but you have to put the work in.

Excuse my lazy formatting, can't be bothered

Techpill
Techpill

because it's everywhere by everything
because it's used* everywhere

iluvmen
iluvmen

Thank you, I have saved this thread and I will get to work immediately.
Does mobile app development pay well??

CodeBuns
CodeBuns

Does mobile app development pay well??
I started at $15 per hour as I suggested above, and I'm making $65k in the Midwest two years later. Not exactly lucrative, but I guess it depends on your standards. After being a NEET, I was happy with $15. People in places like NY and California seem to make $80-100k with the same level of experience, but many of them drive 1+ hour one-way or survive on ramen noodles as the cost of living is much higher there, so it's a trade-off.

Software development is a pretty straightforward ticket to a middle-class existence. Just do something young and in-demand (web, mobile) and get in with a small company where the scope of your responsibility is relatively large... don't become this guy: youtube.com/watch?v=5RQoptKWeQQ

5mileys
5mileys

IT and programming are two different careers.

IT guys don't do any serious programming, and usually you only need community college certs.

Programmers usually have a bachelors or higher in Computer Science.

LuckyDusty
LuckyDusty

I have an app in one of the app stores that has become sort of successful. I could probably be probably making more money with a real job, but why bother

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