CS vs ECE

PackManBrainlure
PackManBrainlure

Which major is best, in your opinion, between Comp. Science and Electrical & Computer Engineering? In terms of career/salary, research opportunities and how interesting the field is. Please don't advise me to "choose what I like", just give your clear opinion.

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ingreso.frba.utn.edu.ar/up/docs/electronica.pdf

Garbage Can Lid
Garbage Can Lid

Short answer :
ECE = (EE + CS) / 2

Long answer :

ECE will take all main core courses from both EE and CS.
So it may be considered harder.

But it leaves out many elective upper level courses.
So it may be considered easier.

Lord_Tryzalot
Lord_Tryzalot

CS

you dont really seem to particularly care for comp eng which is a field Id recommend some interest in before going into it. Its also more intensive.

Its better career wise even if you start as a codemonkey. Everything is online now. Plus eng field is getting flooded now so salaries & opportunities are going to decline. Also easier to start own business with cs

5mileys
5mileys

CE is the academic major that studies computers using math, physics, and EE. CS is for people too weak to pass advanced math or physics courses. Compare:

CS
1st year
Bullshit java/OO coding class
Bullshit data structures class
Piss easy calculus classes
Piss easy matrix algebra class
[If you're lucky] physics I&II for non-science majors

2nd year
Watered down "computer architecture" class
Pompous software engineering class
Pathetic discrete "math" class
Watered down "probability" class
Crash course on formal languages and automata

3rd year
Pathetic algorithms course
Watered down computability and complexity theory course
Laughable networks course
Laughable database course
Crash course on various programing languages

4th year
Laughable computer security course
[If you're lucky] an Operating Systems class
[If you're lucky] a Compilers class
Horseshit AI with trivial machine learning
5-10 student team Capstone with one dude doing all the work
and all the bullshit easy electives you want

CE/ECE/EE
1st year
C++/C Coding class
C++/C Data Structures and Algorithm
Easy vector calculus
Piss easy matrix algebra class
Ordinary Differential Equations
Physics I&II
Chem I&II

2nd year
PDEs, Complex Variables, or Advanced Engineering Mathematics [which is half of each]
Probability and Random Processes
Numerical Analysis
Signal and System Analysis
Circuits
Physics III
Digital Logic
An actual Computer Architecture class

3rd year
Electronics I&II
Communication Systems
Digital Signal Processing
[if CE or ECE] Discrete Math with Coding and Information Theory
[if EE or ECE] Control Theory
[if EE] Electromagnetics
[if CE] Operation Systems
[if CE] Digital System Design
[if CE] Embedded Systems

4th year
Capstone where everyone actually does shit
[if you're unlucky] Ethics
Electives [for CE]:
Compilers
Computer Vision
Computer Graphics
VLSI Design
Networks
Cryptography
Reverse Engineering
Information Theory
Convex Optimization
Distributed Computing
among others

Methshot
Methshot

[if CE or ECE] Discrete Math with Coding and Information Theory
[if CE] Operation Systems
Compilers
Computer Vision
Computer Graphics
Networks
Cryptography
Information Theory
Distributed Computing
These are all CS. Whoever made this pasta obviously has no fucking clue what he's talking about.

PackManBrainlure
PackManBrainlure

I do fear that it might be a degree where I'll learn a little bit of everything, without specializing, which might put me at a disadvantage compared to a CS major if I end up choosing that route.

Emberburn
Emberburn

Op here, and in my country the ECE major has most of those courses.

TalkBomber
TalkBomber

Most CS departments have gotten rid of those courses.

BlogWobbles
BlogWobbles

CS majors are retards. CE is CS before it was watered down to hell.

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eGremlin
eGremlin

Maybe as part of the required core but all of these exist as electives that count towards the total required credits for CS courses. And I go to a shit university.

Raving_Cute
Raving_Cute

No. CE is dumbed down EE plus dumbed down CS.

Inmate
Inmate

CS is already at maximum dumbed down levels.

Methnerd
Methnerd

Community college curricula don't count.

TechHater
TechHater

CS is dumbed and watered down ECE

Boy_vs_Girl
Boy_vs_Girl

EE is the major with most math and physics besides Physics and Math

CS is the STEM major with the least math and physics besides Biology and Architecture.
.

Techpill
Techpill

I was gonna major in Computer Engineering solely for the reason of going into software development. How bad of an idea is that? I just didnt want to do CS

RumChicken
RumChicken

No. ECE is CE.

See

JunkTop
JunkTop

It's better to call it ECE instead of CE.
Because "CE" can represent either
CompE or CivilE, so "CE" is ambiguous.

StrangeWizard
StrangeWizard

Stop being a moron and take CS and math (as a double major)if you want to do the theoretical side without shortchanging any rigor

Otherwise do ECE. Don’t listen to anyone shitposting about one or the other. Both paths are respectable and rewarding.

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SomethingNew
SomethingNew

How many credits would that be? Like I dont have infinite funds

massdebater
massdebater

So guys say if someone wanted to go into software development/engineering and didn't want to study CS would it be better to do a Applied Math/Math with a concentration in Computing type major or a Computer Engineering major?

Methshot
Methshot

if someone wanted to go into software development/engineering and didn't want to study CS
They should neck themselves.

BinaryMan
BinaryMan

Choose what you like user

whereismyname
whereismyname

Completely false

idontknow
idontknow

this.
CS courses are piss easy, and I had the rigor of Math to tie me over before starting OS research in grad school

likme
likme

tide*

whereismyname
whereismyname

I feel bad guys, i'm currently majoring in CS. What do i do to not be like pic related in

MPmaster
MPmaster

Learn to use the shift key.

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askme
askme

I fit them into a traditional 4 year plan. The key is to set aside one summer for some general requirements, get your preliminary courses out of the way (calc 1-3, diff eq, data structures, discrete, comp arch, etc) so you can take all the upper level courses in a fluid fashion

I generally take 2 math and 2 CS courses per semester. If one of them is less strenuous than expected (my first linear alg class was easy money) then I take a gen requirement (online side courses are good for this). I’m required 120 credits to graduate, but I’ll be somewhere around 134ish when I’m done.

Deadlyinx
Deadlyinx

Depends on your CS curriculum and courselist
My undergrad OS class was taken from standord’s pintOS, so it was easily one of the most work intense classes I’ve ever had. Our automata class is pretty difficult too.

I realize that relative to grad school, it’s not bad. The problem with CS is that it’s decent to great at some places (usually research institutions, even public ones) and really bad at others.

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Methshot
Methshot

*Stanford’s

TalkBomber
TalkBomber

ingreso.frba.utn.edu.ar/up/docs/electronica.pdf

EE here, that is my program, how fucked am I?

ZeroReborn
ZeroReborn

I should add that when you’re in the field, your title and distinctions are less important than your work. I have CS professors who work with ECE professors on big projects. Every low abstraction class I’ve had (architecture, OS) has featured a CS teacher with a huge amount of knowledge in RF and signal processing of all things. I guess CS grads used to be huge radio nerds.

I personally hope to be able to work with theoretical CS and physics. I might even go for the quantum computation meme. ;-;

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Evil_kitten
Evil_kitten

There is a lot of hate for CS for obvious reasons which are stated here already.
A good CS university will generally go like this.

1st year
Intro to programming class, Java/Python as it is largely overwhelming to force people to know many of the subtle and trivial things behind lower level languages.
Intro to Datastructures class
Distrete Math 1, run concurrently with intro to data structures.
Linear Algebra, preferable run concurrently with intro to programming for the crossovers with matrices/arrays.
Calc2 (and Calc 1 if you couldn't do calc 2 straight away) for the strong understanding of the language of algebra, also vital stuff like set theory, sequences, continuity etc.
Two electoral classes, done in whatever matters to you. Do something which teaches you to write essays/reports properly and something interesting.
Consider doing accounting as a summer school class. If you ever manage anything, you will be budgeting about as much as you are programming.

takes2long
takes2long

continued.

2nd year
Software Engineering class for the micro stuff, people here tend to disregard it, but stuff like proper testing, polymorphism everything which is magic before you learn it but natural after you know it.
Software safety/analysis class which includes doing a sizable project, preferably a game with decently complex group co-operation, planning and testing.
Discrete Math 2, push into the deeper and more formal understandings of graph theory. Lots of proofs and inductive thinking to know algorithms in depth.
Mathematical probability and Decision making 1, Probably one of the most vital and under-rated courses you can take. Take a higher level course in it based on calculus if you really want to sink your teeth into it. It pays off enormous in AI/ML later.
Computer Architecture, take it even if it seems boring/hard. It will pay off 1000x over when you encounter operating systems, systems programming problems, compilers and so on.
Algorithms/Data Structures, this should be much more general. Graph theory, 3d graphics, parsers, B/B+ trees.
Networking paper, no brainer just do it.
Fill the rest up with whatever electives.

massdebater
massdebater

I took the hardest courses my school offered, OS compilers, automata theory, digital logic, graphics, image analysis, security, etc
it's still piss easy compared to my math curriculum though

BlogWobbles
BlogWobbles

continued.

3rd year
Operating Systems, this is probably one of the hardest but most important courses you can take. Take it, it is worth its weight in gold.
Concurrency, this is a really iffy course but it is generally worth knowing how to do concurrency properly.
Databases, this should be a heavily mathematical, set theory based course. It is probably the most important paper you will encounter regularly in your career.
Intro to AI/ML. These are honestly kind of shitty classes for a semi gimmicky meme paper. It pays off very heavily if combined with statistics properly but it will be a very occasional bit of work outside dedicated AI stuff.
Capstone Project. If it is between making a genuine capstone project, mobile app and video game, pick in the order given here. A real capstone project producing something new will challenge you greatly. A mobile app is about 50x more employable, requires you to think deeply about design and resource limitations. Video games, while fun to make, are genuinely the most frustrating and least enlightening experience you can take for a capstone project.
Advanced Networking papers, these aren't entirely necessary but doing them won't harm you either.
Compilers class. Take it. No question it is the most insightful and valuable class you can take.
Computability and Complexity, interesting and occasionally useful but you will only occasionally come across problems which are genuinely computability problems. Same with encryption.
Automata Theory/Languages (they were taught as one at my uni): Difficult and conceptually useful. Largely intuitively understood by most experienced programmers anyway.

ZeroReborn
ZeroReborn

Turing's autism is a lot more relevant than his love of cock for his role in cracking the enigma machine.

Stupidasole
Stupidasole

That makes sense, but the point is that undergrad CS isn’t standard most places, especially since it’s the hot meme degree that everyone and their mother wants. However, I do agree that pairing CS with math is a great if basically necessary thing if you wanna do grad work, since CS touches so many other fields. You would be crazy not to study continuous mathematics, combinatorics, etc, alongside computation.

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idontknow
idontknow

Continous mathematics is boring

JunkTop
JunkTop

This, I wish more people realized how practical is CS when you want to start your own business.

BunnyJinx
BunnyJinx

In my school these are all CS courses. I am a Computer Engineer.

Stupidasole
Stupidasole

In U.S. these are all c.s. classes.

King_Martha
King_Martha

my school has a fusion of cs, ce and a little bit of ee called computer science and computer engineering, rather than offering pure computer science or pure computer engineering degrees.

haveahappyday
haveahappyday

Read your SICP.

SniperWish
SniperWish

t.commCollege

Dreamworx
Dreamworx

I always find it funny that whenever people say this or claim that those classes are CE they never bother posting any proof.

Its almost like Veeky Forums memes have nothing to do with reality.

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